Colin Goddard was shot four times, but says he received an outpouring of support as he recovered. He worries about others who didn't get the same kind of support. Courtesy of Colin Goddard hide caption

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Courtesy of Colin Goddard

The Uninjured Victims Of The Virginia Tech Shootings

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Luis Gonzalez, John Broughton's grandfather, says that as John got older, he saw his grandson consumed by the violence that surrounded him. Lena Jackson/WLRN/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Lena Jackson/WLRN/Screenshot by NPR

Tracing Gun Violence Through 3 Generations Of A Family

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Jerusha Hodge is among the handful of CeaseFire outreach workers who work to curtail violence in three South Side Chicago neighborhoods. Hodge says shootings are down in the areas where CeaseFire has a presence. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Treat Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis, One Program Says

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Adam Purinton was arrested Thursday and accused of carrying out a shooting in Olathe, Kan. He's seen here in a photo released by the Henry County (Mo.) Sheriff's Office. Henry County Sheriff's Office/AP hide caption

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Henry County Sheriff's Office/AP

Kansas Man Arrested In Shooting That Reportedly Targeted Foreigners

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Former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords says lawmakers should "have some courage" and face their constituents at town halls, despite protests. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Zimmerman (left) and his father, Buddy, in July 2016. Buddy, who was also a veteran, passed away last September. Courtesy of Jay Zimmerman hide caption

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Courtesy of Jay Zimmerman

Veteran Teaches Therapists How To Talk About Gun Safety When Suicide's A Risk

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Chicago police officials ride bikes by a broadcast of President Trump's inaugural address on Jan. 20. The president has threatened to "send in the Feds" to intervene in the city's law enforcement. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Friends and family members attend a memorial service for 17-year-old twin brothers Edward and Edwin Bryant who were shot and killed in October. Chicago has logged more than 700 homicides this year, more than any other major U.S. City Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Gun Deaths In Chicago Reach Startling Number As Year Closes

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Debbie Allen's FREEZE FRAME...Stop the Madness is a musical featuring dance, video and visual art that explores gun violence in cities. Lee Tonks/Courtesy of Debbie Allen Dance Academy hide caption

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Lee Tonks/Courtesy of Debbie Allen Dance Academy

Debbie Allen's 'Weapons' To Stop Gun Violence Are Dance And Music

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A box of 500 .22 cal. bullets are offered for sale at an Illinois gun store in 2012. California voters are voting on a measure that would require ammunition buyers to face the same background checks gun buyers in the state do. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Should Ammunition Buyers Face Background Checks? California's Voters Will Decide

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An ambulance pulls out of the emergency entrance at Temple University Hospital in North Philadelphia. Brad Larrison for NewsWorks hide caption

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Brad Larrison for NewsWorks

Will A Study Save Victims Of Violence, Or Gamble With Their Lives?

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Police tape is displayed at a crime scene in Chicago where a 16-year-old boy was shot in the head and killed and another 18-year-old man was shot in April. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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Amanda McMacken, a registered nurse at Temple University Hospital, shows North Philadelphia residents how to slow bleeding in trauma victims. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

In Philadelphia, Neighbors Learn How To Keep Shooting Victims Alive

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Police tape blocks off a street where a 16-year-old was shot and killed and another 18-year-old was shot and wounded on the on April 25 in Chicago. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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For Stopping A Pandemic Of Gun Violence, Let's Look To The Flu

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Shooting victims Patience Carter of Philadelphia (left) and Angel Santiago (right) listen as Dr. Brian Vickaryous speaks during a news conference Tuesday regarding the treatment of victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Fla. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP