The U.S. rate of gun homicides and other crimes fell after 1993, according to two studies released Tuesday. But a survey showed that only 12 percent of Americans said they felt gun homicides had fallen. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Colwell, director of emergency medicine at Denver Health, has treated victims from two of the deadliest mass shootings in the U.S. He says he's deeply disturbed by how easy it is to get guns. Barry Gutierrez/for NPR hide caption

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Colorado Doctors Treating Gunshot Victims Differ On Gun Politics

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At a Chicago funeral home last week, a painting of 15-year-old shooting victim Hadiya Pendleton stood at the entrance. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama signs a series of executive orders Wednesday about the administration's gun law proposals as Vice President Biden and children who wrote letters to the White House about gun violence look on. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Obama's Plans For Guns Put Focus On Mental Health Of The Young

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State Senator Jeff Klein (L-R), Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, Lieutenant Governor Robert Duffy and Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins congratulate New York Governor Andrew Cuomo after he signed the New York Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act on Tuesday. Hans Pennink/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mental Health Gun Laws Unlikely To Reduce Shootings

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There's wide disagreement on whether firearms in your closet are your doctor's business. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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