Workers try to remove some of the 11 million gallons of oil spilled by the Exxon Valdez off Alaska in 1989. The ship's third mate may have been up for 18 hours before the accident. Rob Stapleton/AP hide caption

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About 40 percent of high schools start before 8 a.m., which contributes to chronic sleep deprivation among teens, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Chris Waits/Flickr hide caption

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About 10 percent of Americans have chronic insomnia. iStockphoto hide caption

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Teenagers' sleep patterns may be a clue to their risk of depression. iStockphoto hide caption

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Don't Blame Your Lousy Night's Sleep On The Moon — Yet

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Research suggests basic forms of learning are possible while snoozing. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Can You Learn While You're Asleep?

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Though scientists have identified sleepwalking triggers, the condition is still a bit of a mystery. Victoria Alexandrova/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Lack Of Sleep, Genes Can Get Sleepwalkers Up And About

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A pediatrician says parents often mistakenly believe all baby accessories are safe.

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When It Comes To Baby's Crib, Experts Say Go Bare Bones

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Sleep researchers say parents of a new child can be a risk for long-term insomnia. Timothy M. Black/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Sleep-Deprived New Parents Don't Have To Hit The (Sleeping Pill) Bottle

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