The large British study, begun in 1958, tracked the diet, habits and emotional and physical health of thousands of people from childhood through midlife. iStockphoto hide caption

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Childhood Stress May Prime Pump For Chronic Disease Later

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Researchers say poor sleep quality, too much sleep and too little sleep all play a role in heart health. iStockphoto hide caption

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Good Quality Sleep May Build Healthy Hearts

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Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

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A Stanford University study explored the medical records of millions of people looking for patterns. People taking proton-pump inhibitors for chronic heartburn seemed to be at somewhat higher risk of having a heart attack than people not taking the pills. IStockphoto hide caption

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Data Dive Suggests Link Between Heartburn Drugs And Heart Attacks

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For someone 2.5 inches shorter than average, the risk of coronary artery disease increases by about 13.5 percent, scientists found. PW Illustration/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Link Between Heart Disease And Height Hidden In Our Genes

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Indian sand artist Sudersan Pattnaik touches up his sculpture for World No Tobacco Day at Golden Sea Beach in Puri, India. Asit Kumar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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What's Most Likely To Kill You? Hint: Probably Not An Epidemic

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Angelina Jolie took a genetic test to find out her risk of breast cancer, and had a preventive double mastectomy. Alastair Grant/PA Photos /Landov hide caption

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Bartender Matt Carucci told NPR in 2012 that he rarely feels safe biking in the city but often rides without a helmet anyway. "There are a lot of other ways to hurt yourself," he said. John Rose/NPR hide caption

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The U.S. ranks first in the world at stopping brain cancers, epidemiologists reported Monday. Here neurosurgeon Dr. Roger Hudgins and his assistant, Holly Zeller of Akron, Ohio, look at an MRI scan before performing surgery to remove a brain tumor. Mike Cardew/MCT /Landov hide caption

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We Evolved To Eat Meat, But How Much Is Too Much?

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A competitor stops for a cigarette after he broke down during the Enduropale race at Le Touquet Beach on February 22, 2009 in Le Touquet, France. Paul Gilham/Getty Images hide caption

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Weight-Loss Surgery May Help Treat, Even Reverse, Diabetes

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If you're overweight, the best way to spend your limited time exercising is aerobic activity, a researcher says. Rhodes ludovic/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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