The JPMorgan Chase headquarters is seen in New York. Sen. Bernie Sanders has said it and other major banks are too big and powerful. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Breaking Up The Banks May Be More Complicated Than It Seems

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Democrats Bernie Sanders (from left), Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley debate in Las Vegas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Break It Down: Democrats On Guns And Wall Street

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President Obama remarks on his proposal to tighten consumer protections for people saving for retirement as Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Labor Secretary Tom Perez listen, at AARP on Monday. Getty Images hide caption

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White House Move To Protect Nest Eggs Sparks Hopes And Fears

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"Who does Washington work for?" asked Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., after her bill that would let people refinance student debt was shot down in June. It was a question she came back to repeatedly in an NPR interview on the Goldman Sachs bailout and federal regulation of the financial sector. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Transcript: Sen. Warren's Full NPR Interview On Financial Regulation

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JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, here seen in June testifying before a congressional committee, will try to explain the bank's trading losses to investors on Friday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Schapiro, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, and Gary Gensler, chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, before a June congressional hearing. Both agencies adopted hundreds of pages of rules this week. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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