Investors in Zhongjin, a wealth-management company that collapsed this month, demonstrate outside a police office in Shanghai's Hongkou district, demanding repayment of their funds. Police later detained one of the demonstrators for distributing protest T-shirts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Chinese Investors Reeling After Wealth Management Firm's Collapse
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To protect against fraud, U.S. banks will be issuing credit cards with small computer chips. But some experts say using a PIN to complete a transaction is more secure than a signature. iStockphoto hide caption

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U.S. Credit Cards Tackle Fraud With Embedded Chips, But No PINs
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