espionage espionage

The theft of agricultural trade secrets is a growing problem, according to the FBI. University of Michigan School of Environment and Sustainability/Flickr hide caption

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University of Michigan School of Environment and Sustainability/Flickr

An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

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A fence surrounds an estate in the village of Upper Brookville in the town of Oyster Bay, N.Y., on Long Island. On Friday, the Obama administration closed this compound for Russian diplomats, in retaliation for spying and cyber-meddling in the U.S. presidential election. Alexander F. Yuan/AP hide caption

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Alexander F. Yuan/AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin heads a meeting on the budget in the Kremlin on Sept. 26. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

Amid Deteriorating U.S.-Russia Relations, Questions Grow About Cyberwar

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Xiaoxing Xi, a Temple University physics professor, speaks in front of a photo of Sherry Chen, a federal government worker, at a September 2015 Washington, D.C., press conference about the spying charges against them that were dropped. Xi says his wife and daughters were marched out of their bedrooms at gunpoint when he was arrested in May 2015. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The Fine Line Between Countering Security Threats And Racial Profiling

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At the height of the Cold War, the FBI and the National Security Agency built a secret tunnel beneath the Russian Embassy (shown here in 2013), so that American spies could eavesdrop on what was happening inside. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Decades After Cold War's End, U.S.-Russia Espionage Rivalry Evolves

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Duane "Dewey" Clarridge, a CIA veteran, speaks in May 2007 during an Arkansas Committee on Foreign Relations luncheon in Little Rock, Ark. The retired spy criticized the CIA's leadership and said a lack of human intelligence had led to mistakes in Iraq, Iran and North Korea. Mike Wintroath/AP hide caption

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Mike Wintroath/AP

Russia's Vladimir Putin makes a speech in 2009 after receiving an award in Dresden, Germany, where he served as a KGB officer during the Cold War. Norbert Millauer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Norbert Millauer/AFP/Getty Images

Spy Vs. Spies: Why Deciphering Putin Is So Hard For U.S. Intelligence

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Courtesy of Doubleday

From Blueprints To Betrayal: The Daring, And Downfall, Of A Cold War Spy

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Jason Rezaian, an Iranian-American correspondent for the Washington Post, faces four serious charges, including espionage, according to his lawyer. He's shown in 2013. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Seed corn sits in the hopper of a planter. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images