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Because a high pH level makes cigars fairly alkaline, consuming tart candies like Skittles or Starbursts can help neutralize the palate. Kristen Hartke for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Hartke for NPR

Gujaratis played a huge role in the expansion of Best Westerns and Days Inns across the country, according to one scholar, partly because they were willing to relocate to places like Berlin, Conn., pictured here. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Mike Mozart/Flickr

Here To Stay: How Indian-Born Innkeepers Revolutionized America's Motels

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Sebastiaan De Vos, right, the general manager of Vienna's Magdas Hotel, recruits refugees like 24-year-old Ehsan Amini, left, to work at the hotel. Amini, who works in the Magdas cafe, fled Afghanistan and arrived in Austria five years ago. He's one of 20 refugees staffing the hotel. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

The New Hotel In Vienna, Run By Refugees

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Brooke Borel says bedbugs were essentially wiped out after World War II thanks to DDT. It's not totally clear why they came back in the past couple of decades. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

The Creepy, Crawly World Of Bedbugs And How They Have 'Infested' Homes

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Kelsey Blodget of Oyster.com photographs the lobby of New York's Trump SoHo hotel. The website relies on tech-savvy workers to create online reviews and track hotel bookings. Oyster.com hide caption

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Oyster.com

Wanted: Digital Bloodhounds For The Hotel Industry

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