The Shanghai Rowing Club (middle) was rescued after preservationists fought a proposed demolition. In the background to the left is the futuristic skyline of Shanghai's financial district, Lujiazui. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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After Decades, A Shanghai Preservationist Heads Home To America

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Zaha Hadid stands before the Riverside Museum, her first major public commission in the U.K., in Glasgow, Scotland, in 2011. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Hadid on Fresh Air (2004)

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2016 Pritzker Prize Goes To Chilean Architect Alejandro Aravena

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A town in California's Central Valley plans to transform farmland into an eco-friendly residential community. An artist's rendering shows plans for Kings River Village in Reedley, Calif. Courtesy of the City of Reedley hide caption

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California's Drought Spurs Unexpected Effect: Eco-Friendly Development

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The twisting Shanghai Tower (right) is the world's second-tallest building and opens soon. Shen Zhonghai/Gensler hide caption

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Shanghai Tower: A Crown For The City's Futuristic Skyline

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An architectural rendering of the Cleveland Clinic's planned cancer center. Courtesy of the Cleveland Clinic hide caption

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Cancer Spawns A Construction Boom In Cleveland

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Palm Springs houses like this represent classic midcentury modern style. Interest in the architecture, art and style of decades past is fueling Palm Springs' rising popularity among younger people. Keith Daly/Flickr hide caption

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Palm Springs Celebrates Its Past, And Tourists Arrive In Droves

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On the outskirts of Rome is a mile-long stretch of unfinished elevated track for a tramline. Work stopped in the mid-1990s. Under the guidance of Renzo Piano, architects are turning it into an elevated park. Courtesy of the G124 Group hide caption

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Italian Architects Look To Replicate Success Of N.Y. High Line In Rome

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Jay Austin's tiny house in Washington, D.C., has 10-foot ceilings, a loft bed over the bathroom and a galley-style kitchen. Franklyn Cater/NPR hide caption

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Living Small In The City: With More Singles, Micro-Housing Gets Big

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The world's tallest timber residential tower, 10 stories, in currently in Melbourne, Australia, though a 14-story Norwegian project may top it in 2015. Courtesy of Lend Lease hide caption

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This concept image shows an aerial view of the proposed Zootopia in Denmark. The designer says the idea is to let the animals roam free, separated from visitors by hidden barriers. Bjarke Ingels Group hide caption

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Glass-Free Menagerie: New Zoo Concept Gets Rid Of Enclosures

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Interns who host tours on Capitol Hill, stopping at sites like the small Senate rotunda, don't always have their facts straight. The Architect of the Capitol hide caption

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Ghost Cats And Musket Balls: Stories Told By Capitol Interns

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ShamsArd, a Palestinian architecture firm, uses packed earth to construct its environmentally friendly homes. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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With Dirt And A Vision, Palestinian Architects Break The Mold

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