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Schools Will Soon Have To Put In Writing If They 'Lunch Shame'

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An M-44 — also known as a "cyanide bomb" for the way it sprays sodium cyanide — sits nested between two rocks. Mark Mansfield, father of a boy accidentally sprayed March 16 in Idaho, calls these devices used to protect livestock from predators "neither safe nor humane." Bannock County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Bannock County Sheriff's Office

An M-44 device — also known as a "cyanide bomb" for the way it sprays sodium cyanide — sits nested between two rocks. Several petitions are now calling for the removal of these devices used to protect livestock from predators. Mark Mansfield, father of a boy accidentally sprayed March 16 in Idaho, calls M-44s "neither safe nor humane." Bannock County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Bannock County Sheriff's Office

Sonny Perdue, who's been named to head the U.S. Department of Agriculture, has held many political offices in his home state of Georgia. Farmers liked him. Environmentalists, not so much. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

A typical label includes safe cooking instructions. This label on blade-tenderized beef sold at Costco recommends 160 degrees as the minimum internal temperature, which doesn't require a three-minute rest time. Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR hide caption

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Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR

Red Lake County, Minn., was ranked by the USDA as the worst place in America to live, based on its "natural amenities" like weather and landscape. J. Stephen Conn/Flickr hide caption

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J. Stephen Conn/Flickr

The USDA has found salmonella on about a quarter of all cut-up chicken parts heading for supermarket shelves. It's a good reason to handle raw chicken carefully, wash your hands afterward, and cook the meat well. Sandor Weisz/Flickr hide caption

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Sandor Weisz/Flickr

USDA Imposes Stricter Limit On Salmonella Bacteria In Poultry Products

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The Super Food Express bus travels to schools in Mobile County, Ala., to ensure children are fed healthy meals when school is out of session. The bus is part of the USDA's summer food program, which President Obama says needs additional funding. USDA/Flickr hide caption

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USDA/Flickr

About 50 percent of the vegetables available today are tomatoes and potatoes, according to new USDA data. Lettuce is the third most available single vegetable. Legumes and all other vegetables make up 41 percent of what's available. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A lunch served by the Yarmouth, Maine, School Department on Sept. 26, 2014, featured Sloppy Joe's made with Maine beef and local beets, carrots, apples and potato salad. More than 80 percent of Maine schools said they served local foods in a survey conducted by the USDA. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr hide caption

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U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

Cattle raised at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center, Neb. A New York Times investigation of animal suffering at the federal research center has prompted a USDA review. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Volunteers pass out fresh vegetables for a Thanksgiving meal at the Alameda Food Bank in Alameda, Calif., in 2009. The percentage of Americans who report struggling to afford food has remained stubbornly near recession-era highs. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images