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President Trump had been urged by world leaders, scientists and CEOs to keep the U.S. in the Paris climate accord, but the agreement's critics won out. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Allie Wist's "Flooded" dinner spread includes burdock and dandelion root hummus with sunchoke chips; jellyfish salad; roasted hen of the woods mushroom; fried potatoes with chipotle vegan mayo; salted anchovies; and oysters with slippers. Most of these are foods that might be more resilient to climate change and, therefore, what we could be eating in the future, Wist says. Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy hide caption

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Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy

NET Power has built carbon capture technology into its power plant outside Houston, which will generate electricity by burning natural gas. The demonstration project should be fully operational later this year, according to NET Power. Courtesy of NET Power hide caption

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Courtesy of NET Power

Natural Gas Plant Makes A Play For Coal's Market, Using 'Clean' Technology

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A diver near Australia's Orpheus Island surveys bleached Great Barrier Reef coral in March 2017. Greg Torda/ACR Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies hide caption

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Greg Torda/ACR Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

A tart cherry orchard in Michigan. Warmer days in early spring and erratic spring weather have hurt yields in recent years. Still, cherry growers are reluctant to discuss the role of climate change. Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio hide caption

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Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan's Tart Cherry Orchards Struggle To Cope With Erratic Spring Weather

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Spraying sea salt into the atmosphere to increase the reflective cloud cover over oceans is the way some scientists think they might be able to bring down Earth's temperature. At least they'd like to safely test the idea on a small scale. Pixza/Getty Images hide caption

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Pixza/Getty Images

Scientists Who Want To Study Climate Engineering Shun Trump

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Graveyard of Staghorn coral, Yonge reef, Northern Great Barrier Reef, October 2016. Greg Torda /ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies hide caption

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Greg Torda /ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Scott Pruitt's comments on carbon dioxide come just over two weeks after he took the helm of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency with the authority to regulate CO2 and other greenhouse gases as pollutants. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Tom Coleman, who manages more than 8,000 acres of pistachio trees across California, is worried that warmer temperatures will affect his crops. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

A natural gas drilling rig's lights shimmer in the evening light near Silt, Colo. Methane is the main component of natural gas, and studies show some methane escapes from leaky oil and gas operations. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Methane's On The Rise, But Regulations To Stop Gas Leaks Still Debated

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Portland's Gulf of Maine Research Institute has designed a trawl net that aims to target species that can still be profitable while avoiding cod. Courtesy of Gulf of Maine Research Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Tropical Storm Colin brought big waves to Fort Myers Beach in Fort Myers, Fla., in early June. Given the threat of serious flooding, Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Climate Change Complicates Predictions Of Damage From Big Surf

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Sea ice melts off the beach of Barrow, Alaska, where Operation IceBridge is based for its summer 2016 campaign. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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Kate Ramsayer/NASA

As July's Record Heat Builds Through August, Arctic Ice Keeps Melting

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