Imagine a bar without the booze. Delegates wrangling in Bonn, Germany, this week have to figure out soon how to cover the world's climate bill. Oliver Berg/DPA/Landov hide caption

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Bull trout are running out of time in Montana as their traditional waters heat up, biologists say. By moving more than 100 fish to higher elevations, fisheries scientists hope to save the species by seeding a new population in waters that will stay cooler longer. Jim Mogen/USFWS hide caption

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New Mexico's largest electric provider — the coal-fired San Juan Generating Station near Farmington — has been defending a plan to replace part of an aging coal-fired power plant with a mix of more coal, natural gas, nuclear and solar power. Susan Montoya Bryan/AP hide caption

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The Antarctic ice sheet stores more than half of Earth's fresh water. Scientists wondered how much of it would melt if people burned all the fossil fuels on the planet. UPI /Landov hide caption

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The Two-Way

What Would Happen If We Burned Up All Of Earth's Fossil Fuels?

Scientists used an estimate of how much fossil fuel is left in the ground to do computer simulations and come up with a worst-case scenario.

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President Obama makes his way across the tarmac Monday to greet well-wishers upon arrival at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage, Alaska. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Floodwaters from rising sea levels have submerged and killed trees in Bedono village in Demak, Central Java, Indonesia. As oceans warm, they expand and erode the shore. Residents of Java's coastal villages have been hit hard by rising sea levels in recent years. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Pope Francis prays during his general audience in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican on June 3. The pope has made statements supporting the idea that climate change is man-made, and his upcoming encyclical on the environment and poverty is highly anticipated. Vincenzo Pinto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A fully loaded container ship sails along the coast. Historically, ships have taken most of the sea measurements that go into the estimate of Earth's average surface temperature. iStockphoto hide caption

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ADP Co-chairs Daniel Reifsnyder (left) and Ahmed Djoghlaf (center) say their negotiation work is difficult but worth it. "We only have one planet, you know," Reifsnyder says. "We have to protect it." Courtesy of IISD/ENB hide caption

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Staghorn coral planted by scientists in the Florida Keys. Researchers hope to give the same sort of boost to the world's shrinking population of pillar coral, now that they can raise the creatures in a laboratory. Joe Berg/Way Down Video/Mote hide caption

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To put their probes into the Arctic Ice, researchers hitched a ride on a South Korean icebreaker. Courtesy of Craig M. Lee/University of Washington hide caption

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An unmanned aerial vehicle films vineyards in France. Drones like this one are also being used in Califiornia, as part of a broader "precision farming" movement designed to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Sami Sarkis/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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A lone polar bear poses on a block of arctic sea ice in Russia's Franz Josef Land. iStockphoto hide caption

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