A heat-stressed koala is doused with water in December 2015 during an extreme heat wave in Adelaide, Australia. Last year was the hottest on record, but 2016 is on pace to supplant it at the top of the list. Every month of this year has set heat records. Morne de Klerk/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Report The Planet Was Hotter Than Ever In The First Half Of 2016

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About 70 percent of Earth is covered by clouds at any given moment. Their interaction with climate isn't easy to study, scientists say; these shape-shifters move quickly. NOAA/Flickr hide caption

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Climate Change May Already Be Shifting Clouds Toward The Poles

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New York City called a travel ban on vehicles in Times Square and elsewhere during last weekend's storm, which broke snowfall records all along the Mid-Atlantic coast. Yana Paskova/Getty Images hide caption

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A Big El Niño Was The Likely Instigator Of Last Week's Blizzard

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Activists hold a banner reading "standing and decided for climate" during a demonstration near the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Dec. 12, 2015, during the United Nations Climate Change Conference. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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French Foreign Minister and President of the COP21 Laurent Fabius (center) gives a thumbs up while U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and French President Francois Hollande applaud after the final meeting of the U.N. conference on climate change in Le Bourget, France, on Saturday. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Climate scientists who scrutinized the U.N. accord are urging citizens to keep a sharp eye on each nation's leaders to make sure they follow through on pledges to reduce emissions. Simone Golob/Corbis hide caption

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Scientists See U.N. Climate Accord As A Good Start, But Just A Start

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U.S. Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, and Kathryn Sullivan, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have been tangling for months over the legitimacy of a climate study NOAA scientists published in Science. Drew Angerer/AP; Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Is This Congressman's Oversight An Effort To Hobble Climate Science?

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President Obama attended the plenary session of the international climate conference Monday, just outside Paris. By using regulations instead of treaties, Obama hopes to continue to cut U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases. Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How Obama Hopes To Achieve U.S. Climate Goals

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Climate models project 21st century global temperatures. NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio and NASA Center for Climate Simulation hide caption

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Big Data Predicts Centuries Of Harm If Climate Warming Goes Unchecked

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A man walks through hundreds of pairs of shoes displayed in Paris as part of a rally called "Paris sets off for climate" on Sunday, Nov. 29. More than 140 world leaders are gathering around Paris for high-stakes climate talks this week. Laurent Cipriani/AP hide caption

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Delegates from about 170 countries gathered in Kyoto in December 1997 during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. This year in Paris, the stakes are even higher, negotiators say. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kyoto Treaty Fizzled, But Climate Talkers Insist Paris Is Different

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A field near harvest time at Meyers Farm in Bethel, Alaska, can now grow crops like cabbage outside in the ground, due to rising temperatures. Daysha Eaton/KYUK hide caption

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Rising Temperatures Kick-Start Subarctic Farming In Alaska

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Zach Whitener, research associate at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, holds a cod while collecting samples for a study. Gulf of Maine Research Institute hide caption

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Why Is It So Hard To Save Gulf Of Maine Cod? They're In Hot Water

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This image shows Hurricane Patricia, a Category 5 storm, blasting toward southwestern Mexico on Friday. The photo was taken from the International Space Station. Scott Kelly/AP hide caption

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Why Hurricane Patricia Can't Be Blamed On Climate Change

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Imagine a bar without the booze. Delegates wrangling in Bonn, Germany, this week have to figure out soon how to cover the world's climate bill. Oliver Berg/DPA/Landov hide caption

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How U.N. Climate Negotiations Are Like Splitting A Bar Tab

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Bull trout are running out of time in Montana as their traditional waters heat up, biologists say. By moving more than 100 fish to higher elevations, fisheries scientists hope to save the species by seeding a new population in waters that will stay cooler longer. Jim Mogen/USFWS hide caption

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Scientists Try Radical Move To Save Bull Trout From A Warming Climate

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New Mexico's largest electric provider — the coal-fired San Juan Generating Station near Farmington — has been defending a plan to replace part of an aging coal-fired power plant with a mix of more coal, natural gas, nuclear and solar power. Susan Montoya Bryan/AP hide caption

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Climate Change Is Not Our Fault

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The Antarctic ice sheet stores more than half of Earth's fresh water. Scientists wondered how much of it would melt if people burned all the fossil fuels on the planet. UPI /Landov hide caption

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What Would Happen If We Burned Up All Of Earth's Fossil Fuels?

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President Obama makes his way across the tarmac Monday to greet well-wishers upon arrival at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage, Alaska. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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