Micro-fish caught by Ben Cantrell: (top row) bleeding shiner, knobfin sculpin, (bottom row) plateau darter and bantam sunfish. Courtesy of Ben Cantrell hide caption

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Courtesy of Ben Cantrell

Little Fish Tales: Micro Fishers Focus On The Species, Not Size

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The underwater construction skills of the caddis fly larva have caught the interest of bioengineers. The larva tapes and glues pebbles together to form a sturdy protective case. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

Peruvian anchoveta being processed at a fish meal factory in Lima in 2009. The small forage species has been heavily fished. Ernesto Benavides/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/AFP/Getty Images

A foreign fishing boat that was caught in Indonesian territorial waters is blown up by Indonesian authorities in Kuala Langsa, Aceh Province on Tuesday. Indonesia sank more than 20 fishing boats Tuesday as part of a stepped up campaign against illegal fishing in its waters. Januar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Januar/AFP/Getty Images

Luna, a German shepherd-husky mix, survived in the wild for five weeks after swimming 2 miles to shore when she fell off her owner's fishing boat. U.S. Navy - Naval Base Coronado Via Facebook hide caption

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U.S. Navy - Naval Base Coronado Via Facebook

Rock shrimp from Florida used to be considered too hard-shelled to be worthwhile as commercial seafood. A custom-made machine to crack and split them has made the sweet crustaceans a favorite for Orlando chef Jessica Tantalo, who prepared them as part of Slow Fish 2016 in New Orleans. Eve Troeh for NPR hide caption

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Eve Troeh for NPR

Herring are delicious, with flaky, mild meat and oil that sizzles on their skin when grilled over a flame. Chefs and ocean advocates have been promoting the environmental and health benefits of eating small fish like this. But the case of the San Francisco Bay's herring shows some of the obstacles to spreading that message. Alastair Bland for NPR hide caption

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Alastair Bland for NPR

The captain and crew of the Moriah Lee pose with sablefish caught off the coast of Half Moon Bay, Calif. A new study found that fishermen in the West Coast sablefishery were much less likely to engage in risky behavior — like sailing out in stormy weather — after catch share quotas were implemented. Courtesy of Ethan Righter hide caption

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Courtesy of Ethan Righter

A fisherman shovels grey sole, a type of flounder, out of the hold of a ship at the Portland Fish Pier in Maine, September 2015. New research finds the ability of fish populations to reproduce and replenish themselves is declining across the globe. The worst news comes from the North Atlantic, where most species are declining. Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Chef Michael Cimarusti, of Los Angeles' Providence restaurant, is pioneering the West Coast incarnation of Dock to Dish, a program that hooks up local fishermen directly with chefs. Courtesy of Providence hide caption

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Courtesy of Providence

LA's Top Restaurant Charts New Waters In Sustainable Seafood

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A traditional fisherman in La Paz, Mexico, who works with SmartFish brings sustainable seafood to market. SmartFish was one of the competitors in last week's Fish 2.0 competition. Courtesy of Smart Fish hide caption

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Courtesy of Smart Fish

Zach Whitener, research associate at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, holds a cod while collecting samples for a study. Gulf of Maine Research Institute hide caption

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Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Why Is It So Hard To Save Gulf Of Maine Cod? They're In Hot Water

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Oceans Called A 'Wild West' Where Lawlessness And Impunity Rule

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Chris Tremblay, a member of the Passive Acoustics group at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, deploys an underwater recording device along the Eastern Seaboard to listen for the mating sounds of Atlantic cod. Courtesy of Chris Tremblay hide caption

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Courtesy of Chris Tremblay

Scientists, Fishing Fleet Team Up To Save Cod — By Listening

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Pacific bluefin tuna for sale for $2.99 per pound at the fish market in San Diego. That shockingly low price does not reflect the deeply threatened state of the bluefin population. Clare Leschin-Hoar for NPR hide caption

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Clare Leschin-Hoar for NPR

Pacific Halibut caught in Cook's Inlet, Alaska. via Wikimedia hide caption

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via Wikimedia

Halibut Dumping Stirs Fight Among Fishing Fleets In Alaska

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A school of vermilion rockfish. After being depleted decades ago by overfishing, rockfish — a genus of more than 100 tasty species — have made a remarkable comeback. Donna Schroeder/From 'Probably More Than You Want to Know About the Fishes of the Pacific Coast'/Courtesy Milton Love hide caption

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Donna Schroeder/From 'Probably More Than You Want to Know About the Fishes of the Pacific Coast'/Courtesy Milton Love