Paul Greenberg says the decline of local fish markets, and the resulting sequestration of seafood to a corner of our supermarkets, has contributed to "the facelessness and comodification of seafood." J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

itoggle caption J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.") Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Pacific Or Bust: Fingerling Chinook salmon are dumped into a holding pen Tuesday as they are transferred from a truck into the Sacramento River in Rio Vista, Calif. From here, they'll be towed downstream for a bit, then make their own way out to the Pacific Ocean. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Cannonball jellyfish soak up the sun on a South Carolina beach. Fishermen are now pursuing the pest that used to clog their shrimping nets. Courtesy of Steven Giese hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Steven Giese

Students prepare fish cakes that will be part of a free dinner offered at Parkside Neighborhood Center in Portland, Maine. Courtesy of Samantha Laster hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Samantha Laster

A sperm whale entangled in a drift net. A report says commercial fisheries around the world kill or injure 650,000 mammals a year. Alberto Romero/Marine Photobank hide caption

itoggle caption Alberto Romero/Marine Photobank

With local cod so scarce, Chef Toby Hill of Lyric Restaurant in Yarmouth Port, Mass., tries out a dogfish salad — served here with garlic aioli on toast — instead. Dogfish is still plentiful in New England waters, but wholesale fisheries say there's not much demand for it in the U.S. Christine Hochkeppel/Courtesy of Cape Cod Times hide caption

itoggle caption Christine Hochkeppel/Courtesy of Cape Cod Times

Migrant workers from Myanmar return to a trawler after unloading fish following a fishing trip in the Gulf of Thailand in Samut Sakhon province Tuesday. A new report details "deceptive and coercive" labor practices in the Thai fishing sector, which relies heavily on workers from Cambodia and Myanmar, also known as Burma. Sakchai Lalit/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Sakchai Lalit/AP

Caleb Newton, who lives in Spotsylvania County, Va., holds the 17-pound, 6-ounce northern snakehead fish he caught in June. The International Game Fish Association has approved a world record for his catch of the invasive predator. Griffin Moores/The Free Lance-Star hide caption

itoggle caption Griffin Moores/The Free Lance-Star

Crew members unload a catch of sockeye salmon at Craig, Alaska, in 2005. Researchers say fish are being found in new areas because of changing ocean temperatures. Melissa Farlow/National Geographic/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Melissa Farlow/National Geographic/Getty Images

Trawlers in the Gulf of Maine are allowed to catch Maine shrimp during a limited season that started this week. Gulf of Maine Research Institute hide caption

itoggle caption Gulf of Maine Research Institute

A commercially harvested crayfish from Lake Tahoe near Incline Village, Nev., in July. Max Whittaker/Prime for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Max Whittaker/Prime for NPR

A fisherman uses a lantern while dip-netting for elvers on a river in southern Maine. Elvers are young, translucent eels that are born in the Sargasso Sea and swim to freshwater lakes and ponds, where they grow to adults before returning to the sea. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Robert F. Bukaty/AP