disability disability

In her book The Virginia State Colony For Epileptics And Feebleminded, poet Molly McCully Brown explores themes of disability, eugenics and faith. Kristin Teston/Persea hide caption

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Kristin Teston/Persea

Poet Imagines Life Inside A 1910 Institution That Eugenics Built

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Medicaid pays the costs for about 62 percent of seniors who are living in nursing homes, some of the priciest health care available. Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM hide caption

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Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM

Stephenie Hashmi and her husband Shawn, at home. She had to leave a demanding nursing job in Kansas City six years ago when her systemic lupus flared and left her unable to work. Alex Smith / KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith / KCUR

Long Waits And Long Odds For Those Who Need Social Security Disability

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Students at the Vida Independiente wheelchair workshop warm up before class. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

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James Fredrick for NPR

Helping Wheelchair Users Navigate Mexico City's Hectic Streets And Sidewalks

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A Lego figure in a wheelchair was introduced at the 67th International Toy Fair in January 2016. He comes in the "City" set, a community of figures shown playing and working in an urban park setting. Daniel Karmann/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Karmann/AFP/Getty Images

Dolls With Disabilities Escape The Toy Hospital, Go Mainstream

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Georgina Mamba's activism for people with disabilities brought her to the United States as one of 1,000 Mandela Washington Fellows under President Obama's Young African Leaders Initiative. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

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Kristin Adair/NPR

Grace Jerry performs her original single "E Go Happen" at a gathering of young African leaders at Montpelier, James Madison's home. The lyrics say: "Yes we can, sure we can change the world." YouTube hide caption

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After a long day, Emeka arrives home to the apartment in South Tulsa that he shares with his father. Kenneth M. Ruggiano for NPR hide caption

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Kenneth M. Ruggiano for NPR

Why Disability And Poverty Still Go Hand In Hand 25 Years After Landmark Law

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From left, Bastian Wurbs (as Titus), Joel Basman (as Valentin) and Nikki Rappl (as Lukas) star in Keep Rollin', a coming-of-age drama featured in the seventh annual Reelabilities film festival. Courtesy of EastWest Film Distribution hide caption

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Courtesy of EastWest Film Distribution

People With Disabilities, On Screen And Sans Clichés

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Carly Medosch has conditions that cause intense fatigue and chronic pain. She took part in a 2014 Stanford Medicine X conference that included discussion of "invisible" illnesses. Yuto Watanabe/Stanford Medicine X hide caption

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Yuto Watanabe/Stanford Medicine X

People With 'Invisible Disabilities' Fight For Understanding

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Debra Blackmon (left) was sterilized by court order in 1972, at age 14. With help from her niece, Latoya Adams (right), she's fighting to be included in the state's compensation program. Eric Mennel/WUNC hide caption

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Eric Mennel/WUNC

Payments Start For N.C. Eugenics Victims, But Many Won't Qualify

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