Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens after securing the GOP nomination in August of 2016. Allies of Greitens are using a nonprofit group to advance his legislative agenda. Michael Thomas/AP hide caption

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Michael Thomas/AP

Secretive Nonprofits Back Governors Around The Country

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Roxanne Weber (left) rallies in support of a voter-approved government ethics overhaul in front of the South Dakota Capitol in Pierre last month. Republican Gov. Dennis Daugaard said he supports efforts to repeal and replace the initiative. James Nord/AP hide caption

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James Nord/AP

South Dakotans Voted For Tougher Ethics Laws, But Lawmakers Object

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The state capitol building in Jefferson City, Missouri. Voters will vote on a ballot measure that would end the state's current practice of allowing unlimited campaign contributions and reimpose limits of $2,600 per candidate. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Missouri Voters To Decide Whether To Rein In Unlimited Political Cash

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Conservative donor David Koch in a 2013 file photo. The political network he and his brother, Charles, have created is not backing Donald Trump's presidential bid this year. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

Koch Network Building A Senate Wall Against Trump

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Dallas on June 16, 2016. Trump's campaign is struggling to raise money to finance his bid against Democrat Hillary Clinton. Ron Jenkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Jenkins/Getty Images

Court documents show the Internal Revenue Service's office in charge of vetting applications for tax-exempt status focused on conservative groups. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images