A molecular biologist is studying how excess sugar might alter brain chemistry, leading to overeating and eventually, obesity. Veronica Grech/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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This Scientist Is Trying To Unravel What Sugar Does To The Brain

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Marlene Simpson of Sacramento, Calif., wears compression bandages daily to help reduce the swelling in her legs. She is getting fitted for compression bandages for her arms to prevent swelling there. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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These Women Discovered It Wasn't Just Fat: It Was Lipedema

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Are We Reaching The End Of The Trend For Longer, Healthier Lives?

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A new study counters the presumption that bariatric surgery is just a short-term fix for severe obesity. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Bariatric Surgery Can Help People Keep Weight Off Long Term

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Surplus corn is piled outside a storage silo in Paoli, Colo. Do federal farm subsidies encourage the production — and perhaps overconsumption — of things that we're told to eat less of, like high fructose corn syrup or meat produced from livestock raised on subsidized grains? Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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There will be about 55 percent more people with diabetes as baby boomers become senior citizens, a report finds. Rolf Bruderer/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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A child runs a shopping cart relay during an Education Department summer enrichment event, "Let's Read, Let's Move." The 2012 event was part of a summer initiative to engage youths in summer reading and physical activity, and provide them information about healthy, affordable food. Many efforts underway are aimed at getting people to think anew about their daily habits. Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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A view of the lush Samoan vegetation in American Samoa, Tutuila Island. LCDR Eric Johnson/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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LCDR Eric Johnson/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

An analysis of 20 studies failed to find good evidence that standing at a work desk is better than sitting. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR
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Sleep Munchies: Why It's Harder To Resist Snacks When We're Tired

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Troy Hodge was only 41 years old when a vessel in his brain burst. "You don't think of things you can't do until you can't do them," he says. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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Matailong Du/NPR

Strokes On The Rise Among Younger Adults

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The number of people being diagnosed with diabetes has been on the decline since 2009. iStockphoto hide caption

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Fewer People Are Getting Diabetes, But The Epidemic Isn't Over

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Physical exercise, diet and supportive counseling are the first steps of any weight-loss program. But sometimes that's not enough to take large amounts of weight off, and keep it off, doctors say. 13/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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13/Ocean/Corbis

Surgery Helps Some Obese Teens In Battle To Get Fit

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