Adults who upped their intake of sugary foods or drank sugar-sweetened drinks gained about a pound a year, a study found. Umberto Salvagnin/Flickr hide caption

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Umberto Salvagnin/Flickr

An analysis of many studies finds a small spare tire may be associated with longer life. But skeptics say that conclusion is rubbish. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Research: A Little Extra Fat May Help You Live Longer

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Many Americans aren't getting the recommended seven to nine hours per night. Franck Camhi/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Franck Camhi/iStockphoto.com

Poor Sleep May Lead To Too Much Stored Fat And Disease

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Doctors may recommend that obese patients use weight-loss drugs to trick their hunger pangs. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Two New Drugs May Help In Fight Against Obesity

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Billionaires John and Laura Arnold are betting that the country's top nutrition researchers can get to the bottom of the obesity epidemic. Courtesy of the John and Laura Arnold Foundation hide caption

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Courtesy of the John and Laura Arnold Foundation

Customers line up for farmers market produce on a corner in Washington, D.C., where people eat more fruits and veggies than in many states. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Shannon Orley, left, meets with her health coach, Kelly Heithold, right, at Providence Alaska Medical Center. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Feidt for NPR

An Alaska Company Losing The Obesity Game Calls In Health Coaches

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