Steve McCurry's iconic photograph of a young Afghan girl in a Pakistani refugee camp appeared on the cover of National Geographic magazine's June 1985 issue and became the most famous cover image in the magazine's history. Steve McCurry/Courtesy of National Geographic hide caption

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Swedish photographer Paul Hansen did not artificially manipulate his prize-winning picture "Gaza Burial," the World Press Photo Foundation said Tuesday. Critics had said the image was a composite of several photos. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Lytro we received to demo is about four inches long. Claire O'Neill/NPR hide caption

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Shoot Now, Focus Later: A Little Camera To Change The Game

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After hearing people shout that a woman was about to jump from a burning building, photographer Amy Weston snapped this image of the woman's leap to safety. Amy Weston/WENN hide caption

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When it comes to building Rube Goldberg machines, there are no limits. Well, as long as you can get it to work... calramen/flickr hide caption

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