The coal plant in Shamokin Dam, Pa., is a local landmark that delivered electricity to this region for more than six decades. It closed in 2014. Next to it, a brand new natural gas power plant is under construction. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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From The Ashes Of Some Coal Plants, New Energy Rises

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A thermoelectric PowerCard like this one can be used to convert waste heat into an electric power source, Alphabet Energy says. Alphabet Energy hide caption

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A Lot Of Heat Is Wasted, So Why Not Convert It Into Power?

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President Obama's environmental plan won't be so hard for states that have moved to cut emissions. But for others it will be more difficult. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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For Some States, New Emissions Rules Will Force A Power Shift

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Jim and Lyn Schneider installed solar panels and batteries because bringing grid power to their house in central Wyoming was going to cost around $80,000. Leigh Paterson/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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When Relying On The Sun, Energy Storage Remains Out Of Reach

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You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong. Marko Korosec/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

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A photo released by Tesla shows its new Powerwall lithium-ion battery pack mounted on the wall (left) of a garage behind one of the company's electric cars. Tesla Energy hide caption

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk Unveils Home Battery; Is $3,000 Cheap Enough?

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Leo Thompson stands in front of his isolated home, where he has lived for 35 years, on the Navajo Nation reservation. Like an estimated 18,000 Navajos homes, his his isn't connected to the electrical grid — it's a half-mile from the nearest line — and until recently Thompson used a generator for power. Ibby Caputo for NPR hide caption

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Solar Power Makes Electricity More Accessible On Navajo Reservation

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Visitors to the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum wait for it to reopen after widespread power outages caused many of the buildings along the National Mall in Washington to shut down temporarily on Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Without horsepower, they rely on human power: Mother and daughter-in-law Sheela and Sunita Devi shred sugarcane into feed. Ibrahim Malik for NPR hide caption

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What's It Like To Live Without Electricity? Ask An Indian Villager

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Elizabeth Ebinger in Maplewood, N.J., bought her solar panels, while neighbor Tim Roebuck signed a 20-year lease. Both are happy with the approach they took, and both are saving money on energy bills. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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The Great Solar Panel Debate: To Lease Or To Buy?

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Solar energy panels on a roof in Marshfield, Mass. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Should Homeowners With Solar Panels Pay To Maintain Electrical Grid?

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A customer walks past a sales counter in a shopping mall during a blackout in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday. Bangladesh was hit by a nationwide blackout on Saturday after a transmission line bringing electricity from neighboring India failed. A.M. Ahad/AP hide caption

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In Del Norte, Colo., Public Works Supervisor Kevin Larimore shows off solar panels that provide electricity for the town's water supply. Despite generating its own solar energy, the town is still at risk of a blackout if its main power line goes down. Dan Boyce/Inside Energy hide caption

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When The Power's Out, Solar Panels May Not Keep The Lights On

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