A resilient tunnel plug inflates during a test. The new technology was created to try to keep New York City subways from flooding. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

To Flood-Proof Subways, N.Y. Looks At Everything From Plugs To Sheets

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For 15 years, Jared Fogle has been the famous face of Subway. Here, Fogle (left) visits a Subway shop in Daytona Beach, Fla., with NASCAR driver Carl Edwards in 2012. Brian Blanco/AP hide caption

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Brian Blanco/AP

Can Subway Freshen Up Its Image After Jared?

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Per the New York Daily News, on weekdays, only 74% of trains arrive on time at terminals. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New Yorkers To Mayor De Blasio: 'Get Used To It'

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Christian Tengblad (right) and his fellow fare dodger are part of the group Planka.nu. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Group Urges Swedes To Evade Subway Fares, And Even Insures Against Fines

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Smoke inhalation victims walk past a firefighter towards a medical aid bus Monday after passengers on the Washington, D.C., subway were injured when smoke filled the L'Enfant Plaza station during the afternoon rush hour. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Going, going, gone. You won't find azodicarbonamide in Nature's Own products. And Subway is phasing it out, too. But lots of manufacturers are still using the additive. Meg Vogel/NPR hide caption

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Meg Vogel/NPR

Almost 500 Foods Contain The 'Yoga Mat' Compound. Should We Care?

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Sandwich chain Subway has announced plans to drop the additive azodicarbonamide from its fresh-baked breads. Above, Subway founder Fred DeLuca poses carrying bread for sandwiches. Jonathan Nackstrand /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Marmaray Project train awaits its inauguration ceremony in Istanbul on Tuesday. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Ottoman Dream Come True: Train Links East And West In Istanbul

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Saudi women get into a taxi outside a shopping mall in Riyadh in 2012. Plans for a subway system in the Saudi capital are likely to provide the biggest benefits to women and the poor. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images