A holding pen for lambs at the Will-O-Wood Farm in southeastern Ohio. Meta Van Nostran hide caption

toggle caption Meta Van Nostran
Lamb Boom Has Sheep Farmers Flocking Together
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/145707773/146127054" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The new version of the map includes 13 zones, with the addition for the first time of zones 12 (50-60 degrees F) and 13 (60-70 degrees F). U.S. Department of Agriculture hide caption

toggle caption U.S. Department of Agriculture

Heirloom beets served at Bibiana Restaurant in downtown Washington, D.C. Joseph Silverman/The Washington Times /Landov hide caption

toggle caption Joseph Silverman/The Washington Times /Landov
A Year That Was Good To Beets
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/144378556/144492615" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Georgia O'Neal harvests winter greens at the Tree and Leaf Farm in Unionville, Va., on March 16, 2011. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Maggie Starbard/NPR

A Chinese beekeeper harvests honey beside a rapeseed field in Anhui province. China is a major producer of honey and bee products. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Funny Honey? Bringing Trust To A Sector Full Of Suspicion
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142903171/143623845" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Maryland farmer Josie Johnson listens to a lecture on extending the farming season using caterpillar tunnels. The lesson was part of a conference for young farmers held in Tarrytown N.Y., in early December. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Maggie Starbard/NPR
Who Are The Young Farmers Of 'Generation Organic'?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/143459793/143595463" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When is filtered honey really honey? The answer may lie in the politics of imported food. Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images

Isabella Colbdorf feeds salad to a turkey at this year's Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen, in upstate New York, on Nov. 20, 2011. Emma Jacobs/WRVO hide caption

toggle caption Emma Jacobs/WRVO
Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142594442/142724362" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Narragansett and Standard Bronze heritage breed turkeys browse at a farm in Westport, Mass. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

toggle caption Stephan Savoia/AP

David Heisler grows 38 varieties of pumpkins on his Maryland farm. Melissa Forsyth/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Melissa Forsyth/NPR
Listen to David Heisler
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142402952/142409081" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Jameson Small uses a late-1800s seeder to plant lettuce at Tuttle farm in Dover, N.H. Small is part of a group of young farmers who are taking care of the land as the owners await a buyer. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jim Cole/AP