When families give up farming and move away, it drains life out of small communities. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

In The Making Of Megafarms, A Mixture Of Pride And Pain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/321705130/322597936" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

David Ng (right) and Amanda Furrow, Customs and Border Protection agricultural specialists, inspect wheat for insects and alien seeds at a port in Baltimore, Md. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Hunting For Alien Bug And Seed Invaders At Baltimore's Port

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/319499925/322438088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Over 90 percent of American figs are grown in California. Two growers there are trying to coax the fruit into ripeness nine months of the year and maybe more. anujd89/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption anujd89/Flickr

Vincent Mourou, co-founder of Vietnam's first artisan chocolate maker Marou, inspects cacao beans at a farmer's garden in Go Cong Tay district. Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images

Backers of the new Open Source Seed Initiative will pass out 29 new varieties of 14 different crops, including broccoli, carrots and kale, on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Plant Breeders Release First 'Open Source Seeds'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/303772556/304041910" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Reece Melton, 18, of Longmont, Colo., is one of 580,000 FFA members across the country. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

toggle caption Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

No Plows, Cows, Sows: Not Your (Grand)Father's Youth Farm Group

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/298890213/301242463" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Farmers participate in a CGIAR climate training workshop on how to interpret seasonal rainfall forecasts in Kaffrine, Senegal. Courtesy of J. Hansen/CGIAR Climate hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of J. Hansen/CGIAR Climate

Customers order food from a McDonald's restaurant in Des Plaines, Ill. The company has promised to start buying "verified sustainable beef" in 2016. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Scott Olson/Getty Images

Free-range chickens lay eggs for Sauder's Quality Eggs in Pennsylvania. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

States Fight California's Chicken Cage Law. But It's Really About Bacon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/286811197/287117401" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The world is increasingly relying on a few dozen megacrops, like wheat and potatoes, for survival. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

toggle caption Danny Johnston/AP

In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/285335070/285581499" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript