Agricultural work, which is physically demanding, is also a risky business venture. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Farm Laborers Get A Foothold With Their Own Organic Farms

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Soil erosion after five inches or more of rain fell in one hour across portions of Western Iowa in 2013. USDA Natural Resources Conservation hide caption

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A lettuce thinner manufactured by Ramsay Highlander removes excess seedlings from the field so that others have room to grow. Just one worker is required to operate the machine. Rachel Estabrook hide caption

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"A œGift for the Grangers" was a recruitment poster for the National Grange printed in 1873. Grange membership around this period was estimated by some to be as high as 2 million. Today it'™s less than 200,000. National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry hide caption

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New Blood Sparks Identity Crisis For Fraternal Group Of Farmers

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A central Illinois farmer plants corn seed into the evening in Farmingdale, Ill. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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As Drought Turns To Flood, Farmers Get 'Weather Whiplash'

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The June issue of The Oprah Magazine includes an article with details on Oprah Winfrey's new farm in Hawaii. The Oprah Magazine hide caption

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This "pinkhouse" at Caliber Biotherapeutics in Bryan, Texas, grows 2.2 million plants under the glow of blue and red LEDs. Courtesy of Caliber Therapeutics hide caption

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Through the City Land Application of Biosolids Program in Geneva, Ill., the fertilizer supplement is provided to local farmers at no cost. City of Geneva/Flickr hide caption

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Clucking all the way to the bank: A hen models a polka-dot diaper from MyPetChicken.com, a multimillion-dollar business that sells everything from chicken caviar treats to day-old birds. Courtesy of MyPetChicken.com hide caption

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American farms like this iceberg lettuce field owned by Duda Farm Fresh Foods outside Salinas, Calif., are facing a dwindling supply of farmworkers from rural Mexico. Kirk Siegler hide caption

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Why An Immigration Deal Won't Solve The Farmworker Shortage

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Cows wait to be milked at a California dairy farm. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Thick jets of processed sewage arc out 30 to 40 feet from giant moving spreaders at Birmingham Farm in Kansas City, Mo. Frank Morris for NPR hide caption

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Cities Turn Sewage Into 'Black Gold' For Local Farms

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