Ambadas Raut uses copper rods known as dowsing sticks to locate sources of underground water in a dry reservoir. He's had 400 clients and says he's found water for 80 percent of them. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Are Indians Turning To The 'Supernatural' In Subterranean Search For Water?

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Despite the ongoing drought in California, the Folsom Lake reservoir is kept at only 60 percent capacity in the winter to prevent major flooding if a winter storm occurs. Some hope to prevent the waste of water by relying on more accurate weather predictions. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hide caption

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In California, Dealing With A Drought And Preparing For A Flood

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Bo Sailor watches Thursday as high surf crashes into the seawall before spilling onto Channel Drive in Montecito, Calif. An ocean-water-quality advisory was issued for the area after a number of December and early-January storms pummeled Southern California with heavy rainfall. Mike Eliason/AP hide caption

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U.S. Weather Wet And Wild In 2015, Though No Big Hurricanes

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A farmer in Ethiopia, in the grips of its worst drought in decades. Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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What Happens When A Disaster Unfolds In Slow Motion

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Francisco Carlos Fonseca is the manager of Marina Confiança, a resort located on the banks of the Cantareira reservoir system. Behind him is a boat ramp that once led to a lake that he says used to be more than 100 feet deep. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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As Brazil's Largest City Struggles With Drought, Residents Are Leaving

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UC Berkeley tree biologist Wendy Baxter is about to begin her ascent of a giant sequoia. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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To Measure Drought's Reach, Researchers Scale The Mighty Sequoia

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A town in California's Central Valley plans to transform farmland into an eco-friendly residential community. An artist's rendering shows plans for Kings River Village in Reedley, Calif. Courtesy of the City of Reedley hide caption

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California's Drought Spurs Unexpected Effect: Eco-Friendly Development

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Five 2,500-gallon water tanks wait to be unloaded at the nonprofit Self-Help Enterprises near Visalia, Calif. So far about 140 tanks have been distributed to homes, but at least 1,000 more are needed in Tulare County alone. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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California's Driest Region Finds Short-Term Drought Aid

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A bathtub ring marks the high-water line on Nevada's Lake Mead, which is on the Colorado River, in 2013. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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How A Historical Blunder Helped Create The Water Crisis In The West

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Farmer Efi Cohen inspects almond trees on a kibbutz south of Jerusalem. The Israeli government says it's safe to use treated sewage water to irrigate tree fruit, but not all crops. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Israel Bets On Recycled Water To Meet Its Growing Thirst

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The sun sets over the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta near Rio Vista, Calif., in 2013. The delta is the largest West Coast estuary and a source of conflict over the state's water. Robert Galbraith /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Endangered Species Protections At Center Of Drought Debate

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