Conservationist Kuki Gallmann speaks at the launch of World Migratory Bird Day, in April 2006. Gallmann was shot in the stomach Sunday while surveying arson damage to her property. TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images

Winter rains have eased the drought in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area northwest of Los Angeles. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

With Drought Emergency Over, Californians Debate Lifting Water Restrictions

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Acutely malnourished child Sacdiyo Mohamed, 9 months old, is treated at Banadir hospital in Somalia on Saturday. Somalia's government has declared the drought there a national disaster. Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP hide caption

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Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP

A woman farmers harvests pearl millet in Andhra Pradesh, India. Millets were once a steady part of Indians' diets until the Green Revolution, which encouraged farmers to grow wheat and rice. Now, the grains are slowly making a comeback. Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar hide caption

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Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar

Beverly Kurtz and Tim Guenthner live near Gross Reservoir outside Boulder, Colo. They oppose a an expansion project that would raise the reservoir's dam by 131 feet. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

High Demand, Low Supply: Colorado River Water Crisis Hits Across The West

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A hamlet between the towns of Tsihombe and Ambovombe, in the most drought-stricken area in southern Madagascar. Most families in the region have resorted to eating wild fruits and tree leaves. Courtesy of Jeanluc Siblot hide caption

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Courtesy of Jeanluc Siblot

Giant sequoias in the Sierra Nevada range can grow to be 250 feet tall — or more. John Buie/Flickr hide caption

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John Buie/Flickr

How Is A 1,600-Year-Old Tree Weathering California's Drought?

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When California Gov. Jerry Brown mandated water cutbacks in 2015, many people responded by having the grass taken out of their lawns and replacing it with more drought-friendly landscaping. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

California's Dire Drought Message Wanes, Conservation Levels Drop

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Bruce Hincks of Meadowood Farm walks through his patch of brussels sprouts in Yarmouth, Maine. Hincks, who has been farming for 40 years, said that this is the worst season, in terms of drought and heat, that he has seen in 10 or 12 years. Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Officials found the toxin microcystin in the blue-green algae present at Discovery Bay, Calif. For people exposed to the toxin, symptoms include dizziness, rashes, fever, vomiting and in more unusual cases, numbness. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Poisonous Algae Blooms Threaten People, Ecosystems Across U.S.

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Ambadas Raut uses copper rods known as dowsing sticks to locate sources of underground water in a dry reservoir. He's had 400 clients and says he's found water for 80 percent of them. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

Are Indians Turning To The 'Supernatural' In Subterranean Search For Water?

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