George Soros, founder and chairman of Soros Fund Management, speaks during the 2011 forum "Charting A New Growth Path for the Euro Zone" in Washington, D.C. Soros now appears concerned that the global economy's path looks shaky. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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A worker leaves the Baosteel Group Corporation plant in Shanghai in March 2016. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Starbucks And Steel: The Divergent Directions Of China's Economy

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Home prices are rising in Shanghai, but that's not stopping buyers. Some analysts say the rise in home prices is not a sign of confidence in the economy — but of uncertainty. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sluggish Economy Doesn't Dampen Shanghai's Housing Prices

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Missing: The Search For A Sister In China

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A state-owned company started building "Liquor City" in a suburb of Luliang to help diversify the economy away from coal. But a massive anti-corruption campaign has damaged demand for expensive Chinese baijiu, or white liquor, and for now, the factory complex remains unfinished. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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China's White Elephants: Ghost Cities, Lonely Airports, Desolate Factories

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A Chinese investor monitors stock prices at a brokerage in Beijing on Wednesday. The country's stock markets have nosedived. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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China's Missteps Tarnish A Reputation For Economic Management

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Civilians hold rocks as they stand on a government armored vehicle near Chang'an Boulevard in Beijing, early June 4, 1989, before the army began a crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in and around Tiananmen Square. Jeff Widener/AP hide caption

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June 4: The Day That Defines, And Still Haunts China

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Years of rapid industrial expansion have left many parts of China contending with thick smog and dirty water. Vincent Yu/AP/DAPD hide caption

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Too Much, Too Fast: China Sees Backlash From Massive Growth

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China said its politically sensitive inflation rate hit a 37-month high of 6.5 percent in July. Food costs, rose by 14.8 percent from a year ago, according to reports. Above, people shop for produce at a Beijing market Tuesday. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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