A resident of the town formerly known as Barrow, Alaska, rides her motorcycle along an Arctic Ocean beach in 2005. The town is now officially called Utqiagvik, its Inupiaq name. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

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Al Grillo/AP

How To Pronounce Utqiagvik

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Dennis Pungowiyi sells his ivory carvings at a craft fair during the annual Alaska Federation of Natives conference. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Ivory Ban Hurts Alaska Natives Who Legally Carve Walrus Tusks

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A video from the Bureau of Land Management-Alaska Facebook page showed a mysterious object moving in the Chena River. The BLM called it an "Ice Monster." Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR

The Anchorage Police Department captured video of a black bear roaming the city's streets. Anchorage Police Department/Screen Shot by NPR hide caption

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Anchorage Police Department/Screen Shot by NPR

The Crystal Serenity, pictured here in Seward, Alaska, is the largest cruise ship to traverse the Northwest Passage, traveling from Alaska to New York City. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio hide caption

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Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio

In Warmer Climate, A Luxury Cruise Sets Sail Through Northwest Passage

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"An Old Walrus, Or 'Morse' " was drawn by Henry Wood Elliott in 1872. He included it in his book Our Arctic Province, next to a description of a walrus haulout in Alaska's Punuk Islands in 1874. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Light shines on the mountains behind the Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska. Guides are using the glacier's rapid retreat as a stark lesson on the effects of climate change. Becky Bohrer/AP hide caption

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Becky Bohrer/AP

Visitors To A Shrinking Alaskan Glacier Get A Lesson On Climate Change

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Aliy Zirkle handles her dogs during a rest in Galena along the Yukon River, her last stop before heading towards Nulato. Late in the night, as she approached Nulato, Zirkle was attacked by a snowmobiler a few miles outside the small community. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

The Tesoro Refinery at Nikiski in Kenai, Alaska, in 2008. Farah Nosh/Getty Images hide caption

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Farah Nosh/Getty Images

Alaska Faces Budget Deficit As Crude Oil Prices Slide

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Alaska legalized pot this year and is the first state to have pot cafes where people can consume marijuana. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption

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Mark Thiessen/AP

Alaska's Pot Cafes Will Give Patrons A Taste Of Cannabis

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The Capitol Christmas Tree is unloaded from a truck following its journey from the Chugach National Forest in Alaska to Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. After it is secured in the ground, the tree will be decorated with thousands of ornaments, handcrafted by children and others from Alaska communities. Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images

A field near harvest time at Meyers Farm in Bethel, Alaska, can now grow crops like cabbage outside in the ground, due to rising temperatures. Daysha Eaton/KYUK hide caption

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Daysha Eaton/KYUK

Rising Temperatures Kick-Start Subarctic Farming In Alaska

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