German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives at a news conference where she announced her plan to run for a fourth term next year. Merkel is the leader of the conservative German Christian Democrats party. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks on Nov. 9 in Berlin, saying that Germany is prepared to work with a Trump administration that respects "democracy, freedom" and human "dignity." Cuneyt Karadag/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Wallonia leader Paul Magnette speaks to the media Wednesday prior to a meeting with Belgium's leaders. Wallonia objected to parts of a major European Union-Canada trade deal that was seven years in the making. But Magnette said Thursday he was willing accept the revised terms. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The debit card the European Union is funding for 1 million Syrian refugees in Turkey, shown in a mock-up, would provide about $30 per person per month to each family member. The idea is to help the refugees in Turkey and keep them from going to countries in Europe. Gokce Saracoglu for NPR hide caption

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Gokce Saracoglu for NPR

Europe's Aid Plan For Syrian Refugees: A Million Debit Cards

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European lawmakers (left to right) Francoise Grossetete of France, Manfred Weber of Germany and Jozsef Szajer of Hungary vote in favor of the Paris climate change agreement on Tuesday. Jean-Francois Badias/AP hide caption

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Jean-Francois Badias/AP

A demonstrator waves a black flag on Monday as people in Warsaw take part in a nationwide strike and demonstration to protest against a legislative proposal for a total ban of abortion in Poland. Janek Skarzynski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hungarian women wearing traditional costume cast their ballot at a polling station in Budapest, Hungary, during a referendum on Oct. 2 on refugee resettlement. Arpad Kurucz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Woydyla of Poland has lived in Britain for 11 years and works at a London restaurant. Many workers from EU countries are struggling with uncertainty about their future in Britain after the Brexit vote. Pawel Kuczynski/AP hide caption

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Pawel Kuczynski/AP

After Brexit, Uncertainty Over Status Of EU Workers Living In U.K.

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David Davis arrives to be named as Brexit Chief after a meeting with U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May on Wednesday. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Newly appointed Secretary of State for exiting the European Union David Davis arrives at 10 Downing Street. He and five other Cabinet members were announced Wednesday by Prime Minister Theresa May. Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images hide caption

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The Brexit vote has raised questions about the fate of the Port Talbot Works, Britain's largest surviving steel plant, located in Wales. Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images

This Steel Town Voted For Brexit. Now Its Jobs Are In Jeopardy

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A European Union supporter stands with a European Union flag during a picnic against Brexit in London's Green Park on Saturday. Daniel Leal-Olivas /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nigel Farage, leader of the UKIP party, sits behind a British flag during a special session of European Parliament in Brussels on Tuesday. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

President Obama is interviewed by NPR's Steve Inskeep at the White House on Monday. Mito Habe-Evans/NPR hide caption

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Mito Habe-Evans/NPR

Obama Cautions Against 'Hysteria' Over Brexit Vote

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In the wake of the Brexit vote, concerns are building about London's status as a center of international banking. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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How Will Brexit Affect London's Status As A Global Financial Center?

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Donald Trump delivers a speech as he officially opens his Trump Turnberry hotel and golf resort in Scotland on Friday. Donald Trump hailed Britain's vote to leave the EU as "fantastic" shortly after arriving in Scotland. Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

The Foreign Ministers from EU's founding six countries — Jean Asselborn from Luxemburg, Paolo Gentiloni from Italy, Jean-Marc Ayrault from France, Frank-Walter Steinmeier from Germany, Didier Reynders from Belgium and Bert Koenders from the Netherlands (left to right) — brief the media after a meeting on the so-called Brexit in Berlin, Germany on Saturday. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

A juggler performs during an audition for a busking spot in the North Hall at Covent Garden Market. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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What Of London's 'Beautiful Idiots And Brilliant Lunatics,' Post-'Brexit'?

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Writer Chris Cleave says the U.K. is "a smaller island that needs friends." James Emmett/Courtesy of ChrisCleave.com hide caption

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James Emmett/Courtesy of ChrisCleave.com

Novelist Chris Cleave On 'Brexit': 'We've Just Shot Ourselves In Both Feet'

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