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Notorious FDA? Feds Turn To Hip-Hop To Tamp Down Teen Smoking

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Bottles of the abortion-inducing drug RU-486, which is used to medically induce abortions in a two-step process. Women take mifepristone (left), and days later, they take misoprostol. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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U.S. Health Agencies Intensify Fight Against Zika Virus

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FDA Approval Could Turn A Free Drug For A Rare Disease Pricey

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Cattle graze in a field near Sacramento, Calif. California Gov. Jerry Brown, along with many health advocacy groups, has called the overuse of antibiotics "an urgent public health problem." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Regulators say R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. must stop selling four kinds of cigarettes because the Food and Drug Administration said the company had failed to show they aren't riskier than cigarettes on the market before mid-February 2007. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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FDA Orders 4 Cigarette Products Pulled From The Market

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A daily pill called Addyi is the first medicine to be approved for the purpose of boosting women's sexual desire. Allen G. Breed/AP hide caption

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FDA Approves First Drug To Boost Women's Sexual Desire

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No More Hidden Sugar: FDA Proposes New Label Rule

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