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The blood-sucking conenose assassin bug (Triatoma sanguisuga) is also called a "kissing bug" because of its tendency to bite human faces. It feeds on human blood and is the vector of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas disease. Ray Coleman/Science Source hide caption

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Ray Coleman/Science Source

Amanda Chaffin comforts son Kayden, 4, who has a genetic condition called spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, and depends on a ventilator to breathe. Chaffin is worried about the high costs of Kayden's care. Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News

Image of a CAR-T cell (reddish) attacking a leukemia cell (green). These CAR-T lymphocytes are used for immunotherapy against cancer (CAR stands for chimeric antigen receptor). After the proliferation of the CAR-expressing T cells, they are transfused back into the patient and can directly detect the cancer cells carrying the antigen. Eye of Science/Science Source hide caption

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Eye of Science/Science Source

'Living Drug' That Fights Cancer By Harnessing Immune System Clears Key Hurdle

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The FDA expanded its warnings about prescription cough and pain medications that contain the narcotics codeine or tramadol. Sujata Jana / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Sujata Jana / EyeEm/Getty Images

Don't Give Kids Cough Syrup Or Pain Meds That Contain Codeine, FDA Says

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Birth control pills actually may be safer for teenagers than for older women, a study finds. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Over-The-Counter Birth Control Pills Would Be Safe For Teens, Researchers Say

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ALS patients and their families rallied for expanded access to experimental drugs in Washington, D.C. on May 11, 2015. Courtesy of Lina Clark hide caption

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Courtesy of Lina Clark

Patients Demand The 'Right To Try' Experimental Drugs, But Costs Can Be Steep

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Sixty-three percent of women who used the Paxman cooling device said they used wigs or head wraps to cover up hair loss, compared to 100 percent of women who didn't try cooling. Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine hide caption

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Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine

Cooling Cap May Limit Chemo Hair Loss In Women With Breast Cancer

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