About a quarter of the chicken parts we buy are tainted with salmonella, according to USDA tests. snowpea&bokchoi/Flickr hide caption

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Clean Up Those Contaminated Chicken Parts, USDA Tells Industry

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Bob O'Connor, a Foster Farms veterinarian, holds an 11-day-old chick at a ranch near the town of Merced, in California's Central Valley. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How Foster Farms Is Solving The Case Of The Mystery Salmonella

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Foster Farms set up new procedures to deal with salmonella contamination after the USDA threatened to shut down its plants last fall. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Pepper is the spice most commonly contaminated with salmonella and other pathogens. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Foster Farms, the chicken processor at the center of a major salmonella outbreak, now faces the threat of a shutdown at its facilities. /PR Newswire hide caption

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A salmonella outbreak that has sickened more than 270 people has been linked to raw chicken produced at three Foster Farms facilities in California. /PR Newswire hide caption

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Amid Big Salmonella Outbreak, USDA Says It's On The Job

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Stewart Parnell (center), former president of the now-defunct Peanut Corp. of America, is one of four executives indicted over a 2009 outbreak of salmonella. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Peanut Firm Executives Indicted Over 2009 Salmonella Outbreak

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Farmworkers like these in California picking produce may soon be required by the FDA to take more precautions against spreading foodborne illness. Heather Craig/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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FDA Releases Rules To Strengthen Safety Of Food Supply

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Your Salad: A Search For Where The Wild Things Were

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A truckload of live turkeys arrives at the Cargill plant in Springdale, Ark., on Aug. 4. Most turkeys in the U.S. are given low doses of antibiotics, which breed resistant strains of bacteria, including Salmonella. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Concerns about salmonella contamination led Cargill to recall 36 million pounds of ground turkey sold under many different brand names, including these packages at a Kroger grocery store in Redwood City, Calif. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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