An employee in a Sydney bookshop in 2012 adjusts packaged cigarettes, which have to be sold in identical olive-brown packets bearing the same typeface and largely covered with graphic health warnings. William West/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption William West/AFP/Getty Images

The headquarters of Reynolds American in downtown Winston-Salem, N.C.. Starting in January, workers there will no longer be allowed to smoke at their desks. Chris Keane/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Chris Keane/Reuters/Landov

Smoking has declined by about 4 percent annually in Uruguay since the country required graphic warnings on cigarette packages. Matilde Campodonico/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Matilde Campodonico/AP

Tobacco giant Reynolds American is buying Lorillard and acquiring Newport, a popular menthol cigarette. In a shrinking market, Newport is one of the few U.S. brands gaining market share. It is particularly popular among African-American smokers. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Some employees say e-cigarettes increase their productivity and help them steer clear of tobacco. But health regulators are looking into possible risks to e-cig users — and to co-workers. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Electronic cigarettes are actually battery operated devices that use a heating element to atomize a flavored liquid, typically containing nicotine, so that it can be inhaled. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Kids as young as 13 purchase e-cigarettes, or "vape pens," online, where independent sellers don't necessarily ask a buyer's age. Jenny Lei Bolario/Youth Radio hide caption

itoggle caption Jenny Lei Bolario/Youth Radio

A CVS pharmacy in Orlando, Fla., is one of more than 7,600 stores where the company will stop selling tobacco products by October. John Raoux/AP hide caption

itoggle caption John Raoux/AP