Women smoke in New York City's Times Square. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Female Smokers Face Greater Risk Than Previously Thought

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A cigarette warning label image approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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In the U.K.-based program called Txt2stop, researchers sent smokers encouraging text messages, like the one above, to help them quit. Karen Castillo Farfán/NPR hide caption

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Text Messages Help Smokers Kick The Habit

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David Ozanich smoked outside the Live Bait bar in New York City in April 2003, a few months after a ban on smoking in bars and restaurants took effect. Diane Bondareff/AP hide caption

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A man smokes a bidi on "No Tobacco Day," May 31, in Allahabad, India. These small, hand-rolled cigarettes are popular in India and Bangladesh because they are far cheaper than regular cigarettes. Rajesh Kumar/AP hide caption

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Treating Everybody With HIV Is The Goal, But Who Will Pay?

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Back in 1998, Colleen Maxwell, then a 23-year-old student, smoked outside a San Diego bar, just weeks after California became the the first state in the nation to to ban smoking in most bars and gambling casinos. Joan C Fahrenthold/AP hide caption

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A competitor stops for a cigarette after he broke down during the Enduropale race at Le Touquet Beach on February 22, 2009 in Le Touquet, France. Paul Gilham/Getty Images hide caption

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R.J. Reynolds' Orbs, a dissolvable tobacco product. The Food and Drug administration is studying the flavored products. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Dissolvable Tobacco Products Draw FDA Scrutiny

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