California is the second state to raise the legal age for purchasing tobacco products from 18 to 21. A similar law went into effect in Hawaii on Jan. 1. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Going slow isn't necessarily the best route to ditching cigarettes. Patrik Stollarz /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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To Quit Smoking, It's Best To Go Cold Turkey

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A fake anti-smoking ad in Moscow reads: "Smoking kills more people than Obama, although he kills a lot of people. Don't smoke! Don't be like Obama!" Dmitry Gudkov/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Russian Pranksters Feature Obama In Fake Anti-Smoking Ad

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Bupropion, sold under the name Wellbutrin, is an antidepressant often prescribed to help a person quit smoking. Michelle Del Guercio/Science Source hide caption

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E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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Most E-Cigarette Users Are Current And Ex-Smokers, Not Newbies

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A woman smokes a cigarette in a Beijing shopping market, even though the practice is now banned inside public spaces. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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How Does A City Stop 4 Million Smokers From Lighting Up?

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Smokers More Likely To Quit If Their Own Cash Is On The Line

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Daniel Gomez (from left), Lister Sena and Ricardo Alvarez were laid off after working for years with Philip Morris in Uruguay. They are now inspectors enforcing the country's tough anti-smoking laws. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Once Philip Morris Workers, Now They Clamp Down On Uruguay's Smokers

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