Going slow isn't necessarily the best route to ditching cigarettes. Patrik Stollarz /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz /AFP/Getty Images

To Quit Smoking, It's Best To Go Cold Turkey

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E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Most E-Cigarette Users Are Current And Ex-Smokers, Not Newbies

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Boston Red Sox starting pitcher Josh Beckett inserts smokeless tobacco as he sits on the bench after being relieved during the eighth inning of a 2012 interleague game against the Philadelphia Phillies. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

No Chew For You, Athletes In Boston (If The Mayor Gets His Way)

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A worker at Boka Tobacco auction floors displays some of the tobacco crop, in Harare, Zimbabwe, Tuesday May 14, 2013. The country's tobacco selling season kicked off in February and to date tobacco worth over $400 million dollars has been sold to buyers mostly from China and the European Union. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

Tobacco Is Smokin' Again In Zimbabwe

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A woman smokes a cigarette in a Beijing shopping market, even though the practice is now banned inside public spaces. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

How Does A City Stop 4 Million Smokers From Lighting Up?

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Food companies can make safety evaluations of their products in secret without ever telling the Food and Drug Administration. Luciano Lozano/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Luciano Lozano/Ikon Images/Corbis

Will this maker of snus, an alternative to cigarettes, be allowed to claim it is less harmful? Swedish Match hide caption

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Swedish Match

Tobacco Firm Seeks Softer Warning For Cigarette Alternative

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An employee in a Sydney bookshop in 2012 adjusts packaged cigarettes, which have to be sold in identical olive-brown packets bearing the same typeface and largely covered with graphic health warnings. William West/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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William West/AFP/Getty Images

Marvin Eaton owns a farm in Belew's Creek, N.C., where he grows 200 acres of tobacco. He bought the farm from his grandfather and plans to pass it down to his son. Emily McCord/WFDD hide caption

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Emily McCord/WFDD

Tobacco Farmers Lose Longtime Safety Net

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Smoking has declined by about 4 percent annually in Uruguay since the country required graphic warnings on cigarette packages. Matilde Campodonico/AP hide caption

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Matilde Campodonico/AP

Philip Morris Sues Uruguay Over Graphic Cigarette Packaging

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Stanford University

The Secret History Behind The Science Of Stress

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A woman tries electronic cigarettes at a store in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

FDA Moves To Regulate Increasingly Popular E-Cigarettes

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