The empty frame (center) from which thieves cut Rembrandt's Christ in the Storm on the Sea of Galilee remains on display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston in 2010. The painting was one of more than a dozen works stolen from the museum in 1990. Josh Reynolds/Associated Press hide caption

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Josh Reynolds/Associated Press

Richard Diebenkorn, Woman on a Porch, 1958; oil on canvas. The Richard Diebenkorn Foundation/Courtesy of SFMOMA hide caption

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The Richard Diebenkorn Foundation/Courtesy of SFMOMA

French artist Abraham Poincheval sits over real chicken eggs until they hatch at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. Stephane de Sakutin /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane de Sakutin /AFP/Getty Images

An Artist Incubating Chicken Eggs Is No Joke. But Is It Art?

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Urban Camouflage for Reptiles: "I basically thought about how turtles have camouflage that doesn't really work very well for them in the urban environments they often live in these days," Keats said. "So my thought was, can we go to our military and look at urban warfare as inspiration." Jonathon Keats hide caption

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Jonathon Keats

Artist's Exhibit Borrows Human Tech To Solve Nature's Manmade Problems

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A limestone slab engraved with an image of an aurochs, or extinct wild cow, discovered at Abri Blanchard in 2012. Ph. Jugie/Musée National de Préhistoire hide caption

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Ph. Jugie/Musée National de Préhistoire

Maurizio Cattelan's America goes on display Friday at the Guggenheim in New York. The artist says it is "one-percent art for the ninety-nine percent." Kris McKay/Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation hide caption

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Kris McKay/Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Pittsburgh Penguins goalie Matt Murray (30) defends against San Jose Sharks' Joe Thornton (19) during the second period of Game 4 of the NHL Stanley Cup final on Monday in San Jose, Calif. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

The Oculus cake now being sold by the new caterer running the SFMOMA's upstairs cafe. The cake was inspired by the distinctive tower at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. It is similar in design and spirit to a cake prepared by Caitlin Freeman and her baking team for a museum event several years ago. (See below.) Connor Radnovich/ Courtesy of The San Francisco Chronicle hide caption

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Connor Radnovich/ Courtesy of The San Francisco Chronicle

Surrey NanoSystems, the U.K. company that makes Vantablack, describes it as "a functionalised 'forest' of millions upon millions of incredibly small tubes made of carbon, or carbon nanotubes." Surrey NanoSystems/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Surrey NanoSystems/Wikimedia Commons

The Graffiti Education and Mural Arts program in San Diego aims to keep kids off the streets — and maybe even make art like this, an example of the famous chicano artists murals found on a series of freeway overpasses, someday. Don Tormey/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Tormey/LA Times via Getty Images

Preventing Juvenile Detention With A Blank Canvas And A Can Of Spray Paint

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