Prisoners sleep inside one of the overcrowded jails in the Tondo district in Manila, Philippines. More than 700,000 suspected narcotics users and dealers have been arrested or turned themselves in since President Rodrigo Duterte announced his war on drugs four months ago. The suspects have overwhelmed the country's jails. Alecs Ongcal hide caption

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Alecs Ongcal

The Nightmarish Conditions For Drug Suspects In Philippine Jails

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte attends a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (not pictured) at the prime minister's office in Tokyo on Wednesday. Duterte made a pitch for enhanced economic ties with Japan. Eugene Hoshiko/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chinese President Xi Jinping (center) holds a welcome ceremony for visiting Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte before their talks in Beijing on Oct. 20. In remarks during his visit, Duterte said, "I announce my separation from the United States. Both in military, not maybe social, but economics also." Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Demanding Greater Respect From U.S., Philippines Looks To China

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Protesters lie on the ground after being hit by a police van during a rally in front of the U.S. Embassy in Manila on Wednesday. A Philippine police van rammed and ran over several protesters. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks during a news conference at the airport in Davao City, prior to his departure for the ASEAN summit on Sept. 5. He called President Obama a "son of a bitch" and warned him not to question extrajudicial killings in the Philippines' war on drugs. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte Distrusts The U.S.

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte addresses army troops near Manila on Tuesday. As the U.S. and the Philippines began annual military exercises, the president said it might be for the last time, adding that, "Mr. Obama, you can go to hell." Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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He Did It Again: Philippine President Keeps Insulting The U.S. (And Obama)

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U.S. Marines Brig. Gen. John Jansen (left), Philippines marines Maj. Gen. Andre Costales (center) and Brig. Gen. Maximo Ballesteros salute during the opening ceremony of the Amphibious Landing Exercise in Manila on Tuesday. The Philippines and the U.S. launched war games on October 4 against the backdrop of the unusual threat of U.S. forces being ejected from the Southeast Asian nation. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks during a presidential awarding ceremony held at the Malacanang Palace in Manila, Philippines, on Monday. George Calvelo/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks in Manila on Aug. 29. Duterte's war on drugs has drawn widespread criticism from human rights groups. But in Davao City, where he was mayor for more than 20 years, he remains extremely popular among residents who say he brought order and improved life in what was a largely lawless city. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Criticized Abroad, Philippines' Leader Remains Hugely Popular In Home City

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The wake for Aristotle Garcia, a suspected drug dealer shot by the police during an operation. Garcia's relatives believe he was not a dealer, but a drug user who was set up. Alecs Ongcal for NPR hide caption

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A Stark Choice For Filipino Drug Addicts: Surrender Or Risk Being Killed

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte arrives Monday in Vientiane, Laos, for the ASEAN Summit. The U.S. canceled a bilateral meeting scheduled for Dutarte and President Obama. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippine police officers investigate after an explosion at a night market that left about 10 people dead and wounded several others in southern Davao City, Philippines, late Friday. Manman Dejeto/AP hide caption

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This giant pearl could be the biggest ever found in the world. The pearl reportedly weighs about 75 pounds and was discovered by a fisherman 10 years ago. Aileen Cynthia Amurao/SWNS.com hide caption

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Aileen Cynthia Amurao/SWNS.com

Residents stand behind a police line, observing the two dead bodies of alleged drug dealers following a drug bust operation that turned into a gunfight last month in Manila, Philippines. Nearly 1,800 people have died, police said, since the government launched a crackdown on illegal drugs after Rodrigo Duterte won a landslide presidential election victory in May with a vow to kill criminals. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In this file photo, Philippine navy personnel and congressmen land at a rock that is part of Scarborough Shoal bearing the Philippine flag that was earlier planted by Filipino fishermen. Jess Yuson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In South China Sea Dispute, Filipinos Say U.S. Credibility Is On The Line

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Small fishing boats sit in the dock in Tanmen on Hainan Island. The government has subsidized the upgrading of Tanmen's fishing fleet as part of its drive to exert more control in the South China Sea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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In A Chinese Port Town, South China Sea Dispute Is Personal

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The new president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte (right) walks beside the new police chief, Ronald Bato Dela Rosa, (left) as he was sworn in on July 1 in Manila. Duterte assumed the presidency on June 30, pledging a ruthless approach to suspected drug traffickers. Dozens have been killed by police in recent days. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Under A Hard-Line President, Dozens Of Drug Suspects Killed In Philippines

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World War II veteran Rudolpho Panaglima lives in Arlington, Va., with his wife, Pura, who holds a portrait of their four children living abroad. Their eldest son, Rolando, has been waiting 20 years for a visa to move to the U.S. from the Philippines. Evie Stone/NPR hide caption

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Filipino World War II Veterans Living In U.S. Can Now Reunite With Family

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