The Sheridan Expressway is little-used, and neighborhood groups hope to convert it to a boulevard. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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After Dividing For Decades, Highways Are On The Road To Inclusion

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Workers at Mahindra's Ann Arbor, Mich., factory load up a new GenZe for shipping to the initial markets of the San Francisco Bay Area and Portland, Ore. Courtesy of Mahindra hide caption

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With 'Pickup Scooter,' America Meets Indian Carmaker

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Is a hoverboard-like scooter your transportation mode of choice? Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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#NoCarForMe: Tell Us About Unconventional Means Of Transport Around You

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Mary Lee Kingsley waits for a bus in Montgomery County, Md. The bus stop has a big LED screen with a map displaying the current location of buses and when they will arrive. Franklyn Cater/NPR hide caption

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Apps, Maps And Head Counts Transforming Public Transit

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The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority tests its Positive Train Control system at the agency's rail yard near Malvern, Pa. The system will cost SEPTA about $328 million. The regional passenger railroad is one of the few in the country that are on track to meet an end-of-the-year deadline for installing PTC. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Few Railroads On Track To Meet End-Of-Year Safety Deadline

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A view of greater New York City from the International Space Station. NASA hide caption

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Reinventing Infrastructure: How Hard Is It?

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A steamboat drifts along the Mississippi River in New Orleans. A group called America's Watershed Initiative says "funding for infrastructure maintenance means that multiple failures may be imminent" for the lower Mississippi River basin. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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The Metro in the nation's capital, was hobbled after an electrical malfunction filled a L'Enfant Metro subway station with smoke on Jan. 13, 2015, killing one woman and sending dozens of people to hospitals. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Mike Lester, CEO of Taxi 2000, sits in the SkyWeb Express in the company's warehouse in Fridley, Minn. The company has been working on SkyWeb Express system, a point-to-point personal rapid transit system. Ackerman + Gruber for NPR hide caption

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Why Nonstop Travel In Personal Pods Has Yet To Take Off

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Star Trek's Mr. Spock and Captain Kirk never even lose pocket change when they use a transporter to get from TV's Starship Enterprise to distant worlds. What gives? Paramount Television/The Kobal Collection hide caption

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Beam Me Up? Teleporting Is Real, Even If Trekkie Transport Isn't

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High-profile events like bridge collapses or road sinkholes (like this one in Maryland in 2010) could make you think America's roads are crumbling. That's not quite true. Logan Mock-Bunting/Getty Images hide caption

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Officials attend the launch of a Positive Train Control system for Los Angeles' Metrolink commuter trains in February 2014 at Los Angeles Union Station. Congress mandated the technology after a Metrolink engineer ran a red light while he was texting and crashed head-on with a freight train in 2008. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Red Tape Slows Control System That Could Have Saved Speeding Train

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Firefighters douse blazes after a freight train loaded with oil derailed in Lac-Mégantic in Canada's Quebec province on July 6, 2013, sparking explosions that engulfed about 30 buildings in fire. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S., Canada Announce New Safety Standards For Oil Trains

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The James C. Nance Memorial Bridge, which connects Purcell and Lexington, Okla., is closed for repair in March 2014. A handful of states have raised their gas taxes in part to fund transportation projects like bridge and road repairs. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Failing Bridges Taking A Toll; Some States Move To Raise Gas Tax

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Emergency workers stand near a burned-out SUV that was struck Tuesday night by a Metropolitan Transportation Authority Metro-North Railroad commuter train near the town of Valhalla, N.Y. Mike Segar/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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James Robertson, 56, walks to catch a bus in Detroit last month. The bus won't take him all the way to his job in Rochester Hills, so he has to walk the last eight miles. Ryan Garza/Detroit Free Press/TNS/Landov hide caption

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Gov. Jerry Brown speaks to the crowd during the California High-Speed Rail Authority groundbreaking event in Fresno. The $68 billion project faces challenges from Republicans in Congress, and from Central Valley farmers suing to block the train from crossing their fields. Gary Kazanjian/AP hide caption

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Construction Begins On California's $68 Billion High-Speed Rail Line

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Passengers ride a cable car that links downtown La Paz with El Alto, Bolivia, in September. The trip costs about 40 cents and takes 10 minutes — compared with 35 cents and a half-hour by minibus. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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High In The Andes, Bolivia's Gondolas In The Sky Ease Congestion

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