A Palestinian Bedouin girl milks a sheep in her family's makeshift camp in the West Bank. Herders live close to their animals, their main source of income. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Harris/NPR

True cheddar cheese can take months — even years — to age. So Claudia Lucero created a faux-cheddar that can be made in very little time. fotolia hide caption

itoggle caption fotolia

Many artisan cheese producers never pasteurize their milk – it's raw. The milk's natural microbial community is still in there. This microbial festival gives cheese variety and intrigues scientists. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

A French cheesemaker sets up wheels of Reblochon, a semi-soft cheese made from raw cow's milk, for maturing in a farm in the French Alps. Anglophone cheesemakers say translating a French government cheese manual will help them make safer raw milk cheese. Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images

Sue Conley (left) and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery, prepare their chilled leek and asparagus soup with creme fraiche and fresh ricotta at Cowgirl Creamery in Point Reyes Station, Calif. Tim Hussin for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tim Hussin for NPR

Eating some foods high in saturated fat is not necessarily going to increase your risk of heart disease, a study shows, contrary to the dietary science of the past 40 years. Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/iStockphoto

Cheese, glorious cheese! The European Union wants U.S. food makers to stop using names with historical ties to Europe. But what else would you call, say, Parmesan and Brie? Dinner Series/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Dinner Series/Flickr

In Wisconsin, a dairy that makes mozzarella and provolone cheeses is giving its leftover salt brine to counties that use it to help melt road ice. Here, wheels of cheese are stacked in a deli. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Microbiologist Christina Agapakis (left) and artist Sissel Tolass show off the cheese they made with bacteria from human skin. The project was part of Agapakis' graduate thesis at Harvard Medical School. Courtesy of Grow Your Own ... Life After Nature at Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Grow Your Own ... Life After Nature at Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin

Shelburne Farms' clothbound cheddar has a bright yellow color because it's made from the milk of cows that graze on grasses high in beta-carotene. Courtesy of A. Blake Gardner hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of A. Blake Gardner

Cows graze in front of the Rosengarten mountain massif in northern Italy. Pasture grazing is practiced throughout the Alps. Matthias Schrader/Associated Press hide caption

itoggle caption Matthias Schrader/Associated Press

There's new evidence that kids can reduce calories and feel full by snacking on veggies and cheese instead of chips. famfriendsfood/Flickr.com hide caption

itoggle caption famfriendsfood/Flickr.com

Archaeologists believe that ancient farmers used pots made from these pottery shards to make cheese — a less perishable, low-lactose milk product. Nature hide caption

itoggle caption Nature