Music Music

Doudou N'Diaye Rose was a brilliant musician and a brilliant dresser as well, with a custom-made wardrobe of vivid, billowing outfits. Above, wearing Senegal's national colors, he sets the beat at a concert in Dakar on Dec. 10, 2010. Seyllou Diallo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Seyllou Diallo/AFP/Getty Images

Members of the Syrian band Khebez Dawle include (from left to right) Hekmat Qassar on guitar and keyboards, lead guitarist Bashar Darwish, bassist Muhammad Bazz and lead singer Anas Maghrebi. Half the band members are now in Turkey, and are strongly considering seeking asylum in Europe. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Syrian Rockers, Fleeing War, Find Safety And New Fans In Beirut

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The rapper V-Sita (at right) had a No. 1 hit in Kenya with the song "Hivo Ndio Kunaendaga." YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

Stop The Foreign Music! African Pop Stars Ask For Government Help

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We all get by better with a little help from our tunes. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Sutures With A Soundtrack: Music Can Ease Pain, Anxiety Of Surgery

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Grace Jerry performs her original single "E Go Happen" at a gathering of young African leaders at Montpelier, James Madison's home. The lyrics say: "Yes we can, sure we can change the world." YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

Iraqi Kurdish singer Helly Luv sings in support of Kurdish fighters, called the peshmerga, who are battling the Islamic State. Her songs are popular among Kurds in northern Iraq, though some critics say her outfits and dancing are un-Islamic. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

In Iraq, A Kurdish Warrior-Diva Sings Against ISIS, Despite Threats

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Even if you don't speak their language, you can likely communicate with these musicians through song and dance: Men from Papua New Guinea; Wiz Khalifa at the 2015 Billboard Music Awards; and Japanese dancers at the Daihanya Festival in Kagoshima City. Ness Kerton/AFP/Getty Images; Ethan Miller/AFP/Getty Images; iStockphoto hide caption

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Ness Kerton/AFP/Getty Images; Ethan Miller/AFP/Getty Images; iStockphoto

Palestinian Line Dance

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Marc Pierce, 51, of Baker City, Ore., wears a Jerry Garcia T-shirt as he heads to the Grateful Dead concert at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif. Jim Gensheimer/TNS /Landov hide caption

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Jim Gensheimer/TNS /Landov

The Grateful Dead, 'Truckin' Into The Sunset

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Neil Young says he supports Bernie Sanders — and that Donald Trump shouldn't have used his song "Rockin' in the Free World." He's seen here performing in Los Angeles earlier this year. Larry Busacca/Getty Images for NARAS hide caption

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Larry Busacca/Getty Images for NARAS

Neil Young Is Displeased That Donald Trump Was 'Rockin' In The Free World'

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After years as punk rockers, Jeneda (right) and Clayson Benally formed the band Sihasin, which means "hope" in Navajo. "We have every possibility to make positive change," says Jeneda. Courtesy of Sihasin hide caption

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Courtesy of Sihasin

Bringing Music And A Message Of Hope To Native American Youth

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