Alicia Watkins for NPR

Breaking Taboo, Swedish Scientist Seeks To Edit DNA Of Healthy Human Embryos

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Molecular markers show structures and cell types within a human embryo, shown here 12 days after fertilization. The epiblast, for example, appears in green. Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University

Advance In Human Embryo Research Rekindles Ethical Debate

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Insulin is produced by the green cells that are in clusters about the same size as the islets in the human pancreas. The red cells are producing another metabolic hormone, glucagon, that prevents low blood sugar. Harvard University hide caption

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Harvard University

Scientists Coax Human Embryonic Stem Cells Into Making Insulin

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Each of these mouse pups was born from an egg scientists created using embryonic stem cells. It's possible the technology could change future treatment for human infertility. Katsuhiko Hayashi hide caption

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Katsuhiko Hayashi

Scientists Create Fertile Eggs From Mouse Stem Cells

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Sue Freeman, 78, checks her email at her home in Laguna Beach, Calif., on Saturday. She says her eyesight improved markedly since she received an experimental stem-cell procedure last July. Melissa Forsyth for NPR hide caption

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Melissa Forsyth for NPR

First Hints That Stem Cells Can Help Patients Get Better

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