Women carry food in gunny bags after visiting an aid distribution center in South Sudan on March 10. Albert Gonzalez Farran /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Albert Gonzalez Farran /AFP/Getty Images

Why The Famine In South Sudan Keeps Getting Worse

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Acutely malnourished child Sacdiyo Mohamed, 9 months old, is treated at Banadir hospital in Somalia on Saturday. Somalia's government has declared the drought there a national disaster. Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP hide caption

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Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP

A storefront of a New York City bodega from the 1950s or '60s. Justo Martí/Courtesy of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies hide caption

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Justo Martí/Courtesy of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies

New York City Bodegas And The Generations Who Love Them

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In a 2015 YouTube video released by al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, commander Nasr al-Ansi claims responsibility for the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. The U.S. military has stepped up attacks on the group in the past month. Daily Motion hide caption

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Daily Motion

U.S. Ramps Up Its Fight Against Al-Qaida In Yemen

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President Trump is embroiled in a defense of a Jan. 29 Yemen raid he ordered. He and his White House have described it as a success, but Sen. John McCain called it a "failure." Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Eager to defend a counterterrorism raid that killed civilians and one U.S. Navy SEAL, the Pentagon found it was touting a decade-old video. But it insists the operation was still worth launching. Daniel Slim/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP/Getty Images

Navy SEALs participate in special operations urban combat training in 2012. The training exercise familiarizes special operators with urban environments and tactical maneuvering during night and day operations. Mass Communication Spc. 2nd Class Meranda Keller/U.S. Navy hide caption

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Mass Communication Spc. 2nd Class Meranda Keller/U.S. Navy

The singer Alsarah: "Sudanese people said I wasn't Sudanese enough. Arabs said I wasn't an Arab. Americans said I wasn't American. I used to be like, 'I don't belong anywhere! Now I'm like you're all mine. All my countries, you're all mine." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Yemeni rescue workers carry a victim on a stretcher amid the rubble of a destroyed funeral hall building following airstrikes by Saudi-led coalition planes on the capital Sanaa last Saturday. Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images

A destroyed vehicle bearing a radar antenna is pictured in the Yemeni port city of Hodeidah on Oct. 13. The U.S. military directly targeted Yemen's Houthi rebels for the first time, hitting radar sites controlled by the insurgents after U.S. warships came under missile attacks twice in four days. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The United Nations humanitarian coordinator for Yemen, Jamie McGoldrick (center, in light blue shirt) inspects a funeral hall on Monday, two days after it was destroyed in Sanaa, Yemen, in an airstrike by a Saudi-led coalition. At least 140 people were killed. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

As Yemen's War Worsens, Questions Grow About The U.S. Role

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Rebels in control of Yemen's capital accused the Saudi-led coalition of killing or wounding hundreds of people in air strikes that hit a large funeral hall in Sanaa Saturday. Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images

Yemenis inspect the damage in a room at a hospital operated by the Paris-based aid agency Doctors Without Borders in Abs, in the northern province of Hajjah, on Tuesday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images