Yemen Yemen

A World Food Programme worker stands next to aid parcels that will be distributed to South Sudanese refugees at the airport in Sudan's North Kordofan state. Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images

Why It's So Hard To Stop The World's Looming Famines

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A Yemeni child suspected of having cholera sits outside a makeshift hospital in the capital, Sanaa, earlier this month. World health authorities say that of the more than 1,300 people who have died of the disease, a quarter have been children. Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images

"In college, I would tell my friends that I wanted to pursue a Ph.D., and they would chuckle and ridicule the idea," says Eqbal Dauqan, who is an assistant professor at the University Kebangsaan Malaysia at age 36. Born and raised in Yemen, Dauqan credits her "naughty" spirit for her success in a male-dominated culture. Sanjit Das for NPR hide caption

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Sanjit Das for NPR

She May Be The Most Unstoppable Scientist In The World

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Girls are treated for a suspected cholera infection at a hospital in Sanaa, Yemen, on May 15. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

Why A Man Is On An IV In His Car Outside A Hospital In Yemen

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Women carry food in gunny bags after visiting an aid distribution center in South Sudan on March 10. Albert Gonzalez Farran /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Albert Gonzalez Farran /AFP/Getty Images

Why The Famine In South Sudan Keeps Getting Worse

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Acutely malnourished child Sacdiyo Mohamed, 9 months old, is treated at Banadir hospital in Somalia on Saturday. Somalia's government has declared the drought there a national disaster. Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP hide caption

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Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP