Members of the South Asian community and others attend a peace vigil for Srinivas Kuchibhotla, the 32-year-old Indian engineer killed at a bar Olathe, Kansas, in Bellevue, Washington on March 5, 2017. Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images

Indian Americans Reckon With Reality Of Hate Crimes

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Martin Luther King, Jr. listening to a transistor radio in the front line of the third march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to campaign for proper registration of black voters, March 23, 1965. Ralph Abernathy (second from left), Ralph Bunche (third from right) and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (far right) march with him. William Lovelace/Getty Images hide caption

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William Lovelace/Getty Images

UCLA students hold crosses, while taking part in a 2006 rally on campus to express their concerns about the lack of racial diversity in the student body. Mel Melcon/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Mel Melcon/LA Times via Getty Images

Veteran Mississippi journalist Bill Minor (seated) points out a ceiling inscription to state Sen. David Jordan, D-Greenwood, at the lectern) in Mississippi Senate chambers in 2015. Minor, who died on Tuesday, was being honored in the 2015 ceremony with a Senate concurrent resolution citing his impact on the state's culture. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Arkansas state Sen. Bart Hester, defends his bill preventing local governments from passing their own anti-discrimination laws. On Thursday, a Fayetteville law was struck down by the state Supreme Court. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

Phoenix residents (left to right) Brendan Mahoney, Jenni Vega and Tony Moya all felt shocked and scared on the night of the recent presidential election. They worry about their rights as LGBT people, but more so, they worry for others more vulnerable than themselves, especially Muslims and people who are in the country illegally. Stina Sieg/KJZZ hide caption

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Stina Sieg/KJZZ

LGBT Community Worries Extend Beyond Itself To Other, More Vulnerable People

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The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd in Birmingham, Ala., in 1966. President Obama has designated an historic civil rights district in Birmingham as a national monument. JT/AP hide caption

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JT/AP

Attorney General Loretta Lynch (right), speaks during a joint news conference to announce the Baltimore Police Department's commitment to a sweeping overhaul of its practices under a court-enforceable agreement with the federal government on Thursday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., attends a meeting on Capitol Hill on Nov. 29, 2016. President-elect Donald Trump says he plans to nominate Sessions as U.S. attorney general. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images