In this Aug. 2014 photo, a chimp sits in a tree at Chimp Haven sanctuary in Keithville, La. Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society of the United States and Chimp hide caption

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For people 50 and older at a high risk for heart disease or stroke, an aggressive approach to treatment has advantages. But there are risks, too. iStockphoto hide caption

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Human stem cells, in this case made from adult skin cells, can give rise to any sort of human cell. Some scientists would like to insert such cells into nonhuman, animal embryos, in hopes of one day growing human organs for transplantation. Science Source hide caption

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Should Human Stem Cells Be Used To Make Partly Human Chimeras?

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National Institutes of Health funding has been flat for years. iStockphoto hide caption

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Bill To Boost Medical Research Comes With A Catch

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Glenn Lightner in 2012 at age 13. His father searched clinicaltrials.gov for years, to no avail, hoping to find a promising experimental cancer treatment that might save his son's life. Courtesy of Lawrence Lightner hide caption

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Results Of Many Clinical Trials Not Being Reported

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Truvada can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV infection when taken as a preventative medicine — if taken every day. Studies are underway to determine if young people are likely to take the pill consistently. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Would A Pill To Protect Teens From HIV Make Them Feel Invincible?

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U.S. funding for medical research by source, 1994-2012. (Data were adjusted to 2012 dollars using the Biomedical Research and Development Price Index.) American Medical Association hide caption

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Postdoctoral researcher Jennifer Foulke-Abel holds the gut-on-a-chip inside the lab at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Researchers Create Artificial Organs That Fit In Your Hand

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Avian influenza, or bird flu, causes an infectious and contagious respiratory disease. In the lab, several scientists have made the H5N1 strain more contagious, a controversial line of research. James Cavallini/ScienceSource hide caption

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Dr. Harold Varmus, a Nobel Prize winner, cancer biologist and director of the National Cancer Institute. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Top Scientists Suggest A Few Fixes For Medical Funding Crisis

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Tom Murphy, 56, in his home in Gainesville, Va., was diagnosed with ALS four years ago. An experimental drug seems to have slowed the progression of his disease, he says, though most ALS patients aren't as lucky. T.J. Kirkpatrick for NPR hide caption

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Patients Vulnerable When Cash-Strapped Scientists Cut Corners

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Randen Patterson left a research career in physiology at U.C. Davis when funding got too tight. He now owns a grocery store in Guinda, Calif. Max Whittaker/Prime for NPR hide caption

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When Scientists Give Up

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U.S. Science Suffering From Booms And Busts In Funding

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The CDC's director, Tom Frieden, testified before a congressional subcommittee Wednesday regarding a recent anthrax incident and lab safety improvements he is instituting. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Head Scientist At CDC Weighs Costs Of Recent Lab Safety Breaches

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Particles of H5N1 virus — a particularly dangerous type of bird flu that can infect people — attack lung cells. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Feds Tighten Lab Security After Anthrax, Bird Flu Blunders

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