Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas, is promoting a campaign to get the National Institutes of Health to exercise the patent rights it already owns in regards to certain drugs to bring down their price. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

One Way To Force Down Drug Prices: Have The U.S. Exercise Its Patent Rights

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Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., embraces Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., during a media briefing about the 21st Century Cures Act on Capitol Hill on Nov. 30. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., and Rep. Fred Upton (right), R-Mich., who have spearheaded the 21st Century Cures Act, speak after a 2015 House of Representatives vote in its favor. Congressional Quarterly/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Congressional Quarterly/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images

Congress Poised To Pass Sweeping Law Covering FDA And NIH

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The federal government spends more than $30 billion a year to fund the National Institutes of Health. What changes are in store under a new administration? NIH/Flickr hide caption

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NIH/Flickr
Simone Golob/Getty Images

HHS Issues New Rules To Open Up Data From Clinical Trials

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In this file photo, a professor holds a tray of stem cells at the University of Connecticut. The NIH plans to lift a moratorium on funding studies using human stem cells in animal embryos. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Chimera Quandary: Is It Ethical To Create Hybrid Embryos?

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Pablo Ross of the University of California, Davis, inserts human stem cells into a pig embryo as part of experiments to create chimeric embryos. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

NIH Plans To Lift Ban On Research Funds For Part-Human, Part-Animal Embryos

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Earlier this week, NIH temporarily halted work in the cell therapy lab of Dr. Steven Rosenberg, chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute, pending a review of safety standards there. Courtesy of National Cancer Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of National Cancer Institute

Task Force Calls For More Safety Oversight At NIH Research Hospital

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The Clinical Center on the campus of the National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Md., is an internationally renowned hospital where patients are also research subjects. NIH/Flickr hide caption

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Katherine Du/NPR

A Fix For Gender-Bias In Animal Research Could Help Humans

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In this Aug. 2014 photo, a chimp sits in a tree at Chimp Haven sanctuary in Keithville, La. Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society of the United States and Chimp hide caption

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Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society of the United States and Chimp

For people 50 and older at a high risk for heart disease or stroke, an aggressive approach to treatment has advantages. But there are risks, too. iStockphoto hide caption

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