Boeing Boeing

A Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121 F-35B Lightning II prepares to make a vertical landing in Yuma, Ariz., in 2013. President-elect Donald Trump asked Boeing to price a version of one of its fighter jets to be competitive with Lockheed Martin's F-35 aircraft. Cpl. Ken Kalemkarian/U.S. Marines hide caption

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Cpl. Ken Kalemkarian/U.S. Marines

An Iran Air Boeing 747 passenger plane sits on the tarmac of the domestic Mehrabad airport in the Iranian capital Tehran in 2013. Behrouz Mehri /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Behrouz Mehri /AFP/Getty Images

An Iran Air Boeing 747 is parked at Mehrabad International Airport in Tehran in this 2003 photo. Boeing has agreed to lease or sell about 100 aircraft to Iran, but there are still potential obstacles. Hasan Sarbakhshian/AP hide caption

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Hasan Sarbakhshian/AP

More Than Airplanes Are Riding On Boeing's Deal With Iran

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Chicago-based aircraft manufacturer Boeing would not divulge details about its deal with Iran Air — not the number of aircraft involved, the specific models or the price tag. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An Iran Air Boeing 747 passenger plane on the tarmac of Mehrabad Airport in Tehran in 2013. Iran bought most of its planes from Boeing before the 1979 Islamic Revolution. The country now has one of the oldest airline fleets in the world. With sanctions lifted, Boeing can once again sell planes to Iran, but the country recently announced a major deal with Airbus. BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images

Boeing Can Sell Planes To Iran, But Does Iran Want Them?

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The new capsules are being built by Boeing and SpaceX. They look similar, but there are differences. SpaceX, The Boeing Company hide caption

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SpaceX, The Boeing Company

How NASA's New Spaceships Stack Up

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In an image provided by NASA, astronaut Randy Bresnik prepares to enter Boeing's CST-100 spacecraft for an evaluation at the company's Houston Product Support Center. NASA awarded Boeing with a $4.2 billion contract Tuesday. AP hide caption

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AP

Many of the machinists were not happy late Friday when it was announced that Seattle-area workers had approved a new contract with Boeing. David Ryder /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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David Ryder /Reuters/Landov

This Boeing 747 "Dreamlifter" landed at the wrong airfield in Wichita, Kan., this week. No damage was done, but there was concern about whether the runway was long enough to allow for a takeoff. After unloading fuel to lighten its load, the big jet was able to leave Thursday. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP