In "The Fish on My Plate," author and fisherman Paul Greenberg sets out to answer the question "what fish should I eat that's good for me and good for the planet?" As part of his quest to investigate the health of the ocean — and his own — Greenberg spent a year eating seafood at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Courtesy of FRONTLINE hide caption

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Courtesy of FRONTLINE

Native westslope cutthroat trout swim in the north fork of the Flathead River in northwestern Montana. However, cutthroat trout populations are threatened by hybridization from mating with rainbow trout. Jonny Armstrong/USGS hide caption

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Jonny Armstrong/USGS

In The Rockies, Climate Change Spells Trouble For Cutthroat Trout

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Eddie Salmeron of the California Ghetto Carping club holds the 50-pound carp he caught in Los Angeles' MacArthur Park. Eddie Salmeron hide caption

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Eddie Salmeron

Fishermen Catch 50-Pound Carp In The Middle Of Los Angeles

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Anchoveta are processed at a fish meal factory in Lima, Peru in 2009. Peru and Chile have the world's largest anchoveta fishery, making them the world's largest producers of fish for fishmeal. Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images

Biologist Shaun Clements counts down the seconds before emptying a vial of synthetic DNA into a stream near Alsea, Oregon. Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix hide caption

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Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix

Concerns about mercury contamination have led many pregnant women to under-consume seafood. So the FDA issued a new chart explaining what to eat and what to avoid. But critics say it muddles matters. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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stock_colors/Getty Images

Scan of an armored poacher, Xeneretmus triacanthus. UW Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers hide caption

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UW Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers

From 'The Water's Edge To The Cutting Edge': Fish Skeletons, CT Scans And Engineering

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Scientific American / Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Fish Have Feelings, Too: The Inner Lives Of Our 'Underwater Cousins'

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The 80-year-old Tsukiji Fish Market currently sits on some of the most valuable land in Tokyo, with easy access to wholesalers, retailers and tourists. Naomi Gingold for NPR hide caption

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Naomi Gingold for NPR

For Tokyo's Famed Fish Market, A Dreaded Death And A Hopeful Rebirth

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