A saliva test allowed scientists to accurately predict how long concussion symptoms would last in children. technotr/Getty Images hide caption

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Spit Test May Reveal The Severity Of A Child's Concussion

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Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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A soldier fires a Carl Gustav recoilless rifle system during weapons practice in Helmand province, Afghanistan. Heavy weapons like these generate a shock wave that may cause brain injuries. Sgt. Benjamin Tuck/CJSOTF-A/DVIDS hide caption

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Sgt. Benjamin Tuck/CJSOTF-A/DVIDS

Pentagon Shelves Blast Gauges Meant To Detect Battlefield Brain Injuries

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Tim Page, former music critic for The Washington Post, is rebuilding his life after a traumatic brain injury in July 2015. Maggie Smith/Courtesy of University of Southern California hide caption

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Maggie Smith/Courtesy of University of Southern California

The Gray Team with Maj. Jennifer Bell (center), who ran a concussion clinic, seen in the Helmand province of Afghanistan in 2010: Col. Michael Jaffee (from left) , Capt. James Hancock, Col. Geoffrey Ling, Lt. Col. Shean Phelps and Col. Robert Saum. Courtesy of Christian Macedonia hide caption

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Courtesy of Christian Macedonia

How A Team Of Elite Doctors Changed The Military's Stance On Brain Trauma

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Katherine Du/NPR

Kit Parker's Story Part I

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Most people who say they've had a concussion say they sought out medical care at the time. Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Libra/Getty Images

Poll: Nearly 1 In 4 Americans Reports Having Had A Concussion

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Months after a concussion or other traumatic brain injury, you may sleep more hours, but the sleep isn't restorative, a study suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

A Concussion Can Lead To Sleep Problems That Last For Years

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Dr. Bennet Omalu speaks on stage during the 2015 Health Hero Awards hosted by WebMD on Nov. 5 in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images hide caption

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Doctor Behind 'Concussion' Wanted To 'Enhance The Lives' Of Football Players

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Evans Army Community Hospital, which stands on the Fort Carson military base, is a central part of the base's behavioral health system. Courtesy of Evans Army Community Hospital/U.S. Army hide caption

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Courtesy of Evans Army Community Hospital/U.S. Army
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Concussions Can Be More Likely In Practices Than In Games

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