Terrell Walker says that her apartment in Washington, D.C., has mold and problems with heating and old appliances. She's been withholding rent in an effort to get her landlord to fix up the apartment. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Low-Income Renters Squeezed Between Too-High Rents And Subpar Housing
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Meagen Limes of Washington, D.C., is struggling to pay rent on the apartment where she lives with her 4-year-old son and 8-year-old daughter. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Living From Rent To Rent: Tenants On The Edge Of Eviction
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The Landlord and Tenant Branch of Superior Court for the District of Columbia is where landlords in the city sue tenants, usually for not paying their rent. Josh Kramer for NPR hide caption

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Welcome To Rent Court, Where Tenants Can Face A Tenuous Fate
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Forget Generation Rent: More Younger Americans Aim To Buy
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Home prices are rising in Shanghai, but that's not stopping buyers. Some analysts say the rise in home prices is not a sign of confidence in the economy — but of uncertainty. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sluggish Economy Doesn't Dampen Shanghai's Housing Prices
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De Desharnais, a homebuilder and real estate agent in Nashua, N.H., stands in front of a house her company is constructing. She says her company had 32 employees at the height of the housing boom, and now only has six despite the industry's gradual recovery. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Will A Fed Interest Rate Hike Slow The Housing Recovery?
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Homeless people and their tents line a canal in Honolulu in June 2015. Hours after a city crew cleared the banks of the canal, the homeless people that had been living there moved right back to the riverside. Cathy Bussewitz/AP hide caption

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Tide Starts To Turn Against The 'Crime' Of Being Homeless
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A startup in Austin, Texas, has built the prototype of a tiny home that could stack up, in a "rack," and move when you do. Kasita hide caption

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Could A Tiny Mobile Studio Solve Your Housing Crisis?
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Angela Chalk looks at a home in New Orleans' 7th Ward that hasn't been touched since Hurricane Katrina. Chalk, the vice president of the 7th Ward neighborhood association, spends some of her free time tracking down and reporting dilapidated and abandoned properties. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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New Orleans Neighborhoods Scrabble For Hope In Abandoned Ruins
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Daniel Harmon, a veteran of the wars in both Afghanistan and Iraq, looks out the window of his room at the Hollywood Veterans Center in Los Angeles. The facility provides housing to homeless vets. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The U.S. Declared War On Veteran Homelessness — And It Actually Could Win
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Jordan McClellan gets help making lunch from daughter Kyra Brooks in their apartment in Southeast Washington, D.C. McClellan has been fighting homelessness for most of her adult life, living in family shelters and transitional housing until she was moved into the rapid rehousing program. Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR hide caption

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For Homeless Families, Quick Exit From Shelters Is Only A Temporary Fix
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The Supreme Court handed a victory to the Obama administration and civil rights groups on Thursday when, by a 5-4 decision, it upheld a key tool used for more than four decades to fight housing discrimination. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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A Tea Party supporter rings a bell in protest of the health care law in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, as Obamacare supporters shout behind her. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Homeless families outside a downtown Seattle shelter. John Ryan/KUOW hide caption

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Homeless Families Wait Longer For Shelter Under Seattle's System
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Tents are pitched illegally on a sidewalk in Seattle in January. The number of people sleeping outside in the city shot up by 20 percent in just the past year. David Ryder/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Amid Seattle's Affluence, Homelessness Also Flourishes
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Ella Barnes-Williams visits the thrift shop associated with Martha's Table, a nonprofit social services organization in Washington, D.C. Anders Kelto/NPR hide caption

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When Life Overwhelms, This Group Lends A Healthy Hand
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Uzuri Pease-Greene, right, leads a walk through the public housing complex in the Potrero Hill neighborhood of San Francisco where her family lives. She is working to have the old buildings replaced. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Improving Housing Can Pay Dividends In Better Health
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A resident of Lathrop Homes leaves one of the few occupied buildings in the development. The city wants to redevelop the public housing as mixed use, and offered vouchers to encourage residents to relocate. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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A Chicago Community Puts Mixed-Income Housing To The Test
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Ephraim Benton, a former resident of Tompkins Houses in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, is now an actor. Benton started a community-based organization called Beyond Influencing Da Hood, which puts on health fairs, film festivals and various free community events in his old housing project. This photo was taken in front of his old building in Tompkins Houses. Courtesy of Shino Yanagawa hide caption

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An Exhibit Offers A Different Angle On Life In Public Housing
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Herman Travis (L) with his friend, Robert Cochran (R) at StoryCorps in San Francisco. Travis delivers groceries from a local food bank to his elderly neighbors, like Cochran. Courtesy of Storycorps hide caption

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The Grocery Delivery Man Who Brings Joy To A Housing Complex
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The $1 billion Brickell City Centre, currently under construction, will house condos, a hotel and a retail and entertainment complex. Condo projects are booming in Miami, financed mostly by foreign buyers. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Foreign Dollars Fuel A New Condo Boom In Miami
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