HUD Secretary Julian Castro hopes his likely successor, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, will come to support many of HUD's programs, but worries whether he'll roll back a new fair housing rule. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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HUD's Castro Worries That Housing Rule Could Be Rolled Back

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Kids play ball on the Wind River Indian Reservation, which is home to members of the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribes. Angie Wagner/AP hide caption

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With Little Housing Growth, Native American Families Live In Close Quarters

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A roofer works on a home in Chapel Hill, N.C. A rebound in spending on home remodeling is a good sign for the U.S. economy. But a shortage of skilled workers is restraining activity. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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There's A Home Renovation Boom, But Good Luck Finding A Contractor

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Robert Carter/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Fewer Young People Buying Houses, But Why?

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In Arlington, Va., WeLive developers say that what residents give up in personal square footage is made up for with large communal areas. WeLive hide caption

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WeLive

They're Small, But These Big-City Apartments Tout Their Communal Feel

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William Kitt has lived in a studio apartment in New York owned by the nonprofit Broadway Housing Communities for 13 years, after decades of living on the streets. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Invisibilia: For An Artist, A Room Of His Own Is A Lifesaver

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Ronit Shy stands in front of the construction site for the building that will be her future home. She was among 200 Israelis who won a housing lottery with 6,000 entrants. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Amid Skyrocketing Housing Prices, A Push For Affordable Homes In Israel

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Marvin Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Neighborhood Association, stands in front of a row of abandoned homes in West Baltimore. He would like to see them torn down and replaced by a food market, a senior center and a health clinic — all of which the neighborhood currently lacks. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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In Baltimore, Hopes Of Turning Abandoned Properties Into Affordable Homes

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Rowhouses in Baltimore sit across the street from a church where Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., held a meeting last summer about, among other things, reducing ex-convict recidivism. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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About 40 percent of Russia's food is imported. As the value of the ruble has declined, prices at grocery stores have risen. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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In Russia, The Oil Price Drop Hits Putin's Base Hard

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Terrell Walker says that her apartment in Washington, D.C., has mold and problems with heating and old appliances. She's been withholding rent in an effort to get her landlord to fix up the apartment. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Low-Income Renters Squeezed Between Too-High Rents And Subpar Housing

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Meagen Limes of Washington, D.C., is struggling to pay rent on the apartment where she lives with her 4-year-old son and 8-year-old daughter. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Living From Rent To Rent: Tenants On The Edge Of Eviction

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The Landlord and Tenant Branch of Superior Court for the District of Columbia is where landlords in the city sue tenants, usually for not paying their rent. Josh Kramer for NPR hide caption

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Welcome To Rent Court, Where Tenants Can Face A Tenuous Fate

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images

Forget Generation Rent: More Younger Americans Aim To Buy

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Home prices are rising in Shanghai, but that's not stopping buyers. Some analysts say the rise in home prices is not a sign of confidence in the economy — but of uncertainty. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sluggish Economy Doesn't Dampen Shanghai's Housing Prices

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De Desharnais, a homebuilder and real estate agent in Nashua, N.H., stands in front of a house her company is constructing. She says her company had 32 employees at the height of the housing boom, and now only has six despite the industry's gradual recovery. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Will A Fed Interest Rate Hike Slow The Housing Recovery?

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Homeless people and their tents line a canal in Honolulu in June 2015. Hours after a city crew cleared the banks of the canal, the homeless people that had been living there moved right back to the riverside. Cathy Bussewitz/AP hide caption

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Tide Starts To Turn Against The 'Crime' Of Being Homeless

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A startup in Austin, Texas, has built the prototype of a tiny home that could stack up, in a "rack," and move when you do. Kasita hide caption

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Kasita

Could A Tiny Mobile Studio Solve Your Housing Crisis?

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Angela Chalk looks at a home in New Orleans' 7th Ward that hasn't been touched since Hurricane Katrina. Chalk, the vice president of the 7th Ward neighborhood association, spends some of her free time tracking down and reporting dilapidated and abandoned properties. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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New Orleans Neighborhoods Scrabble For Hope In Abandoned Ruins

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Daniel Harmon, a veteran of the wars in both Afghanistan and Iraq, looks out the window of his room at the Hollywood Veterans Center in Los Angeles. The facility provides housing to homeless vets. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The U.S. Declared War On Veteran Homelessness — And It Actually Could Win

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Jordan McClellan gets help making lunch from daughter Kyra Brooks in their apartment in Southeast Washington, D.C. McClellan has been fighting homelessness for most of her adult life, living in family shelters and transitional housing until she was moved into the rapid rehousing program. Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR hide caption

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For Homeless Families, Quick Exit From Shelters Is Only A Temporary Fix

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