Inside the Capitol, lawmakers are battling over health care and the budget. Outside, many government services may come to a stop at midnight. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Ailsa Chang on what's expected to happen Monday

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The federal government remains on track to miss a midnight Monday deadline to fund its operations. Chambers of Congress sharply disagree over a temporary funding bill. Here, the Capitol is seen Saturday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Sen. Ted Cruz's anti-Obamacare strategy seemed to fall flat Tuesday with many of his fellow Senate Republicans. They urged him to back down out of concern over a possible government shutdown next week. C-SPAN.org screen shot hide caption

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Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) talks to reporters Thursday about the deadline to fund the government while simultaneously eliminating President Obama's health care law. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Anthony Weiner on Tuesday, before the results came in and before he waved goodbye. Eduardo Munoz /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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A reporter (not Deep Throat) strikes a dramatic pose beside one of the columns inside the Arlington, Va., garage where Bob Woodward met with his secret source during the Watergate days. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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San Diego Mayor Bob Filner (D). Fred Greaves /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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During the 2012 campaign cycle, CNN was among several news networks that hosted Republican debates. Now, the GOP says it doesn't want to be on either that network or NBC. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Journalist Jack Germond on Morning Edition

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A photo taken of the clown who wore a mask resembling President Obama during a rodeo Saturday at the Missouri State Fair. Jameson Hsieh/AP hide caption

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A photo taken of the clown who wore a mask resembling President Obama during a rodeo at the Missouri State Fair on Saturday. Jameson Hsieh/AP hide caption

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